1. Prepared With the Technical Assistance of:
      2. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
      3. NEW WINDSOR TOWN BOARD
      4. PLANNING CONSULTANT
      5. TABLE OF CONTENTS
      6. Page
      7. LIST OF TABLES
      8. Page
      9. LIST OF FIGURES
      10. Following Page
      11. I. INTRODUCTION
      12. A. Mission Statement
      13. B. Principles of the Plan
      14. C. General Planning Policies
      15. D. Background
      16. E. State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA)
      17. II. POPULATION, HOUSING, AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
      18. A. Goals
      19. Table 1 – Historic Population & Projected, 1960-2020
      20. Table 2 – Population by Age, 2000
    1. Age Distribution
      1. 2. Housing
      2. Table 3 – Housing Stock, 2000
      3. Table 5 – Housing Value, 2000
      4. Housing Value, 2000
      5. Table 7 – Orange County HUD Eligibility Income Limits, 2007
      6. Table 8 – Orange County Low Income Rent Limits Including Utilities, 2007
      7. 3. Residential Development Opportunities
      8. Table 9 – Potential Residential Population
      9. Table 10 – Residential Development Potential by Zoning District
      10. C. Recommendations
      11. 1. Neighborhood Quality
      12. 2. Housing Production
      13. Figure 2, Conservation Subdivision Design
      14. Figure 3, Conservation Subdivision Design
      15. Figure 4, Conservation Subdivision Design
      16. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
      17. A. Goals
      18. C. Recommendations
      19. 1. Airport Related Development
      20. 2. Other Major Economic Development Areas
      21. 3. Design Guidelines
      22. Figure 5
      23. IV. NATURAL RESOURCES
      24. A. Goals
      25. 1. Water resources
      26. 2. Wetlands and Floodplains
      27. 3. Significant Animal and Plant Habitats
      28. Table 12 – State Listed Animal Communities
      29. Table 13 – State Listed Plant Communities
      30. 4. Stewart Forest Lands
      31. C. Recommendations
      32. 1. Groundwater Resources
      33. 2. Surface Water Resources
      34. Air Resources
      35. 4. Open Space
      36. 5. Tree Preservation
      37. V. TRANSPORTATION
      38. A. Goals
      39. 1. Road Network
      40. 2. Automobile Traffic
      41. Table 14 – Traffic Volumes, 1980 – 2002
      42. 3. Transit
      43. 4. Trucking / Freight
      44. 5. Stewart Airport
      45. 6. Traffic Safety & Vehicular Accidents
      46. C. Recommendations
      47. 1. Roads
      48. 2. Public Transportation
      49. 3. Traffic Calming
      50. VI. PARKS, RECREATION, & HISTORIC RESOURCES
      51. A. Goals
      52. 1. Local Parks
      53. 2. New York State Parks
      54. 3. School Facilities
      55. 4. Private Recreational Facilities
      56. Table 17 – Town of New Windsor Parks
      57. 5. Orange County Park & Open Space Plans
      58. 6. Sidewalks
      59. 7. Historic Resources
      60. Table 18 – Listed Historic Structures
      61. Table 19 – Local Homes of Distinction
      62. C. Recommendations
      63. 1. Park Lands
      64. 2. Architectural Survey
      65. 3. Historic Preservation
      66. VII. UTILITIES
      67. A. Goals
      68. 2. Sewer
      69. C. Recommendations
      70. VIII. AGRICULTURE
      71. A. Goals
      72. C. Recommendations
      73. IX. LAND USE & ZONING
      74. A. Summary of Existing Conditions
      75. 1. Land Use
      76. Table 20 – Existing Land Use by Category, 2007
      77. 2. Existing Zoning
      78. 3. Planning & Zoning in Adjoining Communities
      79. B. Recommendations
      80. X. PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
      81. A. High Priority Implementation Items
      82. 1. Population, Housing, & Residential Development
      83. 2. Economic Development
      84. 3. Natural Resources
      85. 4. Transportation
      86. 5. Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources
      87. 6. Agriculture
      88. 7. Land Use & Zoning
      89. B. Moderate Priority Implementation Items
      90. 1. Population, Housing, & Residential Development
      91. 2. Natural Resources
      92. Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources
      93. 4. Agriculture
      94. C. Ongoing Implementation Items
      95. 1. Population, Housing, & Residential Development
      96. 2. Economic Development
      97. 3. Natural Resources
      98. 4. Transportation
      99. 5. Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources
      100. 6. Utilities
      101. 7. Agriculture

NEW WINDSOR 2009 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE
Town of New Windsor
Orange County, New York
Prepared With the Technical Assistance of:
Turner Miller Group
2 Executive Blvd.
Suite 401
Suffern, NY 10901
Telephone No.: (845) 368-1472
Fax:
(845) 368-1572

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page i
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Frank Bedetti
Howard Brown
Eric Lundstrom
Randy Siper
William Steidle
Susan Weyant
Todd Wiley
Stuart Turner, FAICP, PP, Advisor
Fred W. Doneit, Advisor
Kristen O’Donnell, Advisor
NEW WINDSOR TOWN BOARD
George Green - Town Supervisor
Patricia Mullarkey - Councilwoman
Susan Weyant - Councilwoman
Alice Biasotti - Councilwoman
Eric Lundstrom - Councilman
PLANNING CONSULTANT
Turner Miller Group
2 Executive Boulevard
Suite 401
Suffern, NY 10901
MAY 2009
This project is made possible, in part, with funds from the County of Orange and the
Orange County Planning Department.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
I.
Introduction...............................................................................................................I-1
A. Mission Statement.................................................................................................I-2
B. Principles of the Plan ............................................................................................I-2
C. General Planning Policies .....................................................................................I-2
D. Background ...........................................................................................................I-3
E. State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) ............................................I-4
II. Population, Housing, and Residential Development Opportunities ....................... II-5
A. Goals ................................................................................................................... II-5
B. Summary of Existing Conditions........................................................................ II-5
1.
Population ....................................................................................................... II-5
2.
Housing ........................................................................................................... II-7
3.
Residential Development Opportunities ....................................................... II-11
C. Recommendations............................................................................................. II-14
1.
Neighborhood Quality .................................................................................. II-14
2. Housing Production ...................................................................................... II-15
III. Economic Development....................................................................................... III-19
A. Goals ................................................................................................................ III-19
B. Summary of Existing Conditions..................................................................... III-19
C. Recommendations............................................................................................ III-20
1. Airport Related Development ...................................................................... III-20
2.
Other Major Economic Development Areas................................................ III-20
3. Design Guidelines........................................................................................ III-21
IV. Natural Resources ................................................................................................IV-23
A. Goals ................................................................................................................IV-23
B. Summary of Existing Conditions.....................................................................IV-23
1.
Water resources............................................................................................IV-23
2. Wetlands and Floodplains............................................................................IV-24
3.
Significant Animal and Plant Habitats.........................................................IV-24
4. Stewart Forest Lands....................................................................................IV-25
C. Recommendations............................................................................................IV-26
1.
Groundwater Resources...............................................................................IV-26
2. Surface Water Resources .............................................................................IV-26
3. Air Resources...............................................................................................IV-27
4. Open Space ..................................................................................................IV-28
5.
Tree Preservation .........................................................................................IV-29
V. Transportation ....................................................................................................... V-30
A. Goals ................................................................................................................. V-30
B. Summary of Existing Conditions...................................................................... V-30
1. Road Network ............................................................................................... V-30
2. Automobile Traffic ....................................................................................... V-31
3. Transit ........................................................................................................... V-32
4.
Trucking / Freight ......................................................................................... V-33
5. Stewart Airport.............................................................................................. V-33

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page iii
6.
Traffic Safety & Vehicular Accidents .......................................................... V-36
C. Recommendations............................................................................................. V-37
1. Roads............................................................................................................. V-37
2. Public Transportation.................................................................................... V-39
3.
Traffic Calming............................................................................................. V-39
VI. Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources.............................................................VI-41
A. Goals ................................................................................................................VI-41
B. Summary of Existing Conditions.....................................................................VI-41
1. Local Parks...................................................................................................VI-41
2. New York State Parks..................................................................................VI-41
3. School Facilities...........................................................................................VI-42
4. Private Recreational Facilities .....................................................................VI-42
5.
Orange County Park & Open Space Plans...................................................VI-43
6. Sidewalks .....................................................................................................VI-44
7.
Historic Resources .......................................................................................VI-44
C. Recommendations............................................................................................VI-48
1. Park Lands ...................................................................................................VI-48
2. Architectural Survey ....................................................................................VI-49
3.
Historic Preservation....................................................................................VI-49
VII. Utilities............................................................................................................... VII-51
A. Goals .............................................................................................................. VII-51
B. Summary of Existing Conditions................................................................... VII-51
1. Water Supply ............................................................................................. VII-51
2. Sewer.......................................................................................................... VII-52
C. Recommendations.......................................................................................... VII-53
VIII. Agriculture ........................................................................................................ VIII-54
A. Goals ............................................................................................................. VIII-54
B. Summary of Existing Conditions.................................................................. VIII-54
C. Recommendations......................................................................................... VIII-54
IX. Land Use & Zoning .............................................................................................IX-56
A. Summary of Existing Conditions.....................................................................IX-56
1. Land Use ......................................................................................................IX-56
2. Existing Zoning............................................................................................IX-57
3.
Planning & Zoning in Adjoining Communities...........................................IX-59
B. Recommendations............................................................................................IX-60
X. Plan Implementation ............................................................................................. X-65
A. High Priority Implementation Items ................................................................. X-65
1.
Population, Housing, & Residential Development ....................................... X-65
2.
Economic Development................................................................................ X-66
3.
Natural Resources ......................................................................................... X-66
4. Transportation ............................................................................................... X-66
5.
Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources...................................................... X-67
6. Agriculture .................................................................................................... X-67
7.
Land Use & Zoning ...................................................................................... X-67
B. Moderate Priority Implementation Items.......................................................... X-69
1.
Population, Housing, & Residential Development ....................................... X-69

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page iv
2.
Natural Resources ......................................................................................... X-69
3.
Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources...................................................... X-69
4. Agriculture .................................................................................................... X-70
C. Ongoing Implementation Items ........................................................................ X-70
1.
Population, Housing, & Residential Development ....................................... X-70
2.
Economic Development................................................................................ X-70
3.
Natural Resources ......................................................................................... X-72
4. Transportation ............................................................................................... X-73
5.
Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources...................................................... X-73
6. Utilities.......................................................................................................... X-74
7. Agriculture .................................................................................................... X-74

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page v
LIST OF TABLES
Page
Table 1
Historic Population, 1960-2020 .........................................................................6
Table 2
Population by Age, 2000....................................................................................7
Table 3
Housing Stock, 2000..........................................................................................8
Table 4
Units in Structure, 2000 .....................................................................................8
Table 5
Housing Value, 2000 .........................................................................................9
Table 6
Median Home Value, 2000 ................................................................................9
Table 7
Orange County HUD Eligibility Income Limits, 2007....................................11
Table 8
Orange County Low Income Rent Limits Including Utilities, 2007 ...............11
Table 9
Potential Residential Population ......................................................................14
Table 10 Residential Development Potential by Zoning District ...................................14
Table 11 Employment by Industry, 2000........................................................................19
Table 12 State Listed Animal Communities ...................................................................24
Table 13 State Listed Plant Communities.......................................................................24
Table 14 Traffic Volumes ...............................................................................................32
Table 15 Vehicular Accidents at Major Intersections, 2001-2006 .................................36
Table 16 Vehicular Injuries at Major Intersections, 2001-2006 .....................................37
Table 17 Town of New Windsor Parks...........................................................................43
Table 18 Historic Structures ...........................................................................................45
Table 19 Local Homes of Distinction .............................................................................47
Table 20 Existing Land Use by Category, 2007 .............................................................57

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page vi
LIST OF FIGURES
Following Page
Figure 1 Basemap.............................................................................................................3
Figure 2 Conservation Design...................................................................................on 15
Figure 3 Conservation Design...................................................................................on 17
Figure 4 Conservation Design...................................................................................on 17
Figure 5 Façade Design.............................................................................................on 22
Figure 6 Environmental Resources ................................................................................23
Figure 7 Natural Heritage Areas ....................................................................................24
Figure 8 Transportation Network ...................................................................................31
Figure 9 Parks, Recreation, & Open Space ....................................................................41
Figure 10 Water Districts .................................................................................................51
Figure 11 Sewer Districts .................................................................................................52
Figure 12 Existing Land Use............................................................................................57
Figure 13 Existing Zoning................................................................................................57
Figure 14 Land Use Plan ..................................................................................................61

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 1
I.
INTRODUCTION
One of the most important powers granted to a municipality by the State of New York is
the authority and responsibility to undertake comprehensive planning and land use
regulation for the purpose of protecting the public health, safety and general welfare of its
residents. A comprehensive plan includes an analysis of existing conditions, the
identification of problem areas, a discussion of both the long and short term goals aimed
at achieving an overall vision, and a plan for implementing specific tools to help a
community reach its stated goals. Adoption of this comprehensive plan will be subject to
the provisions of the State Environmental Quality Review Act and a Generic
Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) will be prepared.
The most important function for a Plan is to help guide the future growth and
development of the Town, through a series of coordinated goals, policies and strategies.
The Plan should record the best thinking of the Town as to its future physical growth and
development and to give direction to both public and private development.
The Plan should encompass a long term vision of the community, but while its objectives
are long-range, the Plan should be capable of offering guidance for short-range land use
decisions upon adoption. Although it is often difficult to address immediate issues and
problems with long-range concepts and principles, short term solutions without respect
for long-term purposes can dilute the ultimate effectiveness and impact of the immediate
solution.
The format of the Plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapters two through eight include
the primary development issues addressed in the Plan. Chapter nine addresses the overall
proposed land use pattern and incorporates the goals and recommendations of chapters
two through seven. The final chapter outlines the steps necessary for implementation and
the basis for revising or adding zoning and land use regulations. The primary subjects
are:
o Population, Housing & Residential Development
o Economic Development
o Natural Resources
o Transportation
o Water & Sewer
o Agriculture
o Land Use & Zoning
The Draft Plan has been developed by the Planning Consultant with extensive input from
the Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee. Two public workshops have been held
and public input has been received through the Town’s website and a Town Hall drop off
for written comments.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 2
A.
Mission Statement
The mission statement developed with input from the Comprehensive Plan’s Citizens
Advisory Committee is:
Balance residential and non-residential development in a responsible manner that will
allow for improved protection of natural resources and maintenance of the traditional
rural residential character of portions of the Town, while increasing the tax base,
encouraging attractive economic activity with higher paying jobs and providing a variety
of housing types and supportive municipal services to meet the needs of present and
future residents.
B.
Principles of the Plan
The Plan has been formulated in accordance with a set of overall principles, which should
be used as the basis for all Town actions:
1. Recognize the uniqueness of New Windsor as a community within the rapidly
growing Hudson Valley region, and strive to preserve its suburban and exurban
character.
2. Promote economic growth to ensure a balanced and economically viable
community.
3. Preserve the important natural resources and historic qualities of New Windsor.
4. Promote the development of a modern sustainable economy and environment that
supports residents and enhances the quality of life.
5. Plan for changes within the community so that new development or
redevelopment results in a residential community with a superior quality of life
consistent with contemporary planning principles.
6. Enhance the sense of community for residents of the Town, by providing for a
central focus of activity, public services that enhance the wellbeing of residents,
and increased opportunities to live, work and shop in New Windsor.
C.
General Planning Policies
The general planning policies of the Plan are to:
1. Recognize that New Windsor is part of a larger region; therefore, planning its
future must take into account the impact, beneficial or otherwise, of this
interdependent relationship.
2. Encourage actions by all Town agencies and departments to reflect the goals,
policies and strategies of the Plan. All pertinent codes, regulations, and ordinances

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 3
which effect development should be reviewed, strengthened where necessary, and
enforced to support the goals of the Plan.
3. The Town’s financial resources should be considered when planning for future
municipal improvements and services.
4. Promote greater citizen awareness of and participation in, local planning efforts
through meetings, publications, and other appropriate mechanisms.
5. Set up an escrow system for developers to assure adequate funds for necessary
planning, engineering, and other expert reviews to assist the Planning Board during
all project reviews.
D.
Background
The Town of New Windsor is located along the Hudson River approximately 60 miles
north of New York City in Orange County, New York. It is bordered to the north by the
City and Town of Newburgh and the Town of Montgomery, to the west by the Town of
Montgomery and the Town of Hamptonburgh, to the south by the Town of Blooming
Grove and the Town of Cornwall, and to the east by the Hudson River (refer to Figure 1).
New Windsor was originally part of lands deeded to Captain John Evens in the late
1600s. Once vacated, it became part of the lands known as the “Precinct of the
Highlands”. In 1743 more definite borders were delineated which encompassed parts of
the present towns of New Windsor, Newburgh, Marlboro, and Plattekill until 1762 when
the precinct was divided and the Town of New Windsor and City of Newburgh were
created.
1
During much of the Revolutionary War, New Windsor served as the major
command post for the Continental Army.
The Town evolved in an organic fashion over time due to its proximity to the Hudson
River and surrounding larger cities, particularly New York City. Rail service and road
infrastructure created to serve these other large cities slowly began to infiltrate the eastern
portion of the Town which generated opportunities for development in this area.
Industrial and commercial uses slowly emerged along rail lines and the River while
residential development occurred just west of this development to accommodate workers.
Throughout the 1960’s and 1970’s residential development spread westward as
transportation infrastructure was greatly expanded. Historic land use patterns have
remained consistent.
A major force in the Town’s history was the development of Stewart Airport, dating back
to 1930, which served primarily military purposes. It’s now emerging into a major
regional air and cargo facility that will have a major influence on the Town’s
development.
1
Ruttenber, E.M. and L.H. Clark. History of Orange County, New York. Interlaken, NY. 1986. page 210.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 4
E.
State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA)
New York State’s Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) establishes a process to
review an action’s potential impact on a community and its environment, and to mitigate
any adverse impacts which may result. The SEQRA process identifies and establishes
thresholds for the types of activities likely to require no environmental review (Type II
Action), or, conversely, activities likely to require the preparation of full documentation
in the form of a draft and/or final environmental impact statement (Type I). The adoption
of a Comprehensive Plan is considered a Type I Action.
The Town Board, the only body that may adopt a Plan, will automatically be the Lead
Agency to conduct the SEQR process.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 5
II.
POPULATION, HOUSING, AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
A.
Goals
Goal: Maintain and improve the quality of existing neighborhoods and housing stock.
Goal: Expand and protect housing opportunities for residents of the Town.
Goal: Plan to accommodate growth at densities commensurate with environmental and
infrastructure constraints in well planned neighborhoods.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
1.
Population
The Town of New Windsor, with a current estimated population of 24,966, makes up
approximately 6.7 percent of the total population of Orange County as of 2005. The
populations of both New Windsor and Orange County increased significantly between
1960 and 1970. Over the twenty years that followed, the population continued a high rate
of growth, but slightly declined between 1990 and 2000. The U.S. Census estimates that
the population has rebounded significantly from approximately 22,866 in 2000 to
approximately 24,966 in 2005 an increase of 8.4 percent. The Orange County Planning
Department estimates that the population will again sharply increase both at the local and
County levels. By the year 2020 it is projected that population within New Windsor may
reach almost 40,000.
The 1975 Town Comprehensive Plan had estimated much greater population increases
projecting a population total between 41,000 and 57,000 by 1985 and 76,900 by the year
2000.
Table 1 below shows historic population totals in the Town of New Windsor and Orange
County from 1960 to 2000 and population projections from various sources. As noted,
the Census Bureau estimates the 2005 Town population to be nearly 25,000.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 6
Table 1 – Historic Population & Projected, 1960-2020
Year
New Windsor
Percent Change
Orange County
Percent Change
1960
11,908
--
183,734
--
1970
2
16,650
39.82%
221,657
20.64%
1980
3
19,502
17.13%
259,603
17.12%
1990
22,937
17.61%
307,647
18.51%
2000
22,866
-0.31%
341,367
10.96%
2005
4
24,966
9.18%
372,893
9.24%
2010
5
30,099
20.56%
386,215
3.57%
2020
39,621
31.64%
436,954
13.14%
Multiple sources; see footnotes.
Age related data is helpful to understand potential future needs for housing and other
services. The median population age within the Town is 36.7 years which is slightly
higher than the County median age of 34.7. The population is spread out relatively
evenly among the other age cohorts. Compared to the County, New Windsor has a lower
percentage of school-aged children and a greater percentage of senior citizens (refer to
Table 2).
Historic and Projected Population
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
45,000
1960
19
70
1980
1
990
20
00
2005
20
10
2020
Population
Multiple sources; see footnotes.
2
1960 and 1970 population totals from Town of New Windsor Basic Studies Summary, Proposed Development Plan.
Manuel S. Emanuel Associates, Inc. 1975.
3
1980 population provided by Orange County Data Book, Orange County Department of Planning and Development,
1986
4
1990, 2000 census population totals and 2005 population estimate provided by U.S. Census Bureau
5
2010 and 2020 population projections from Orange County Department of Planning, 2002

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 7
Table 2 – Population by Age, 2000
New Windsor
Orange County
Age Group
Population
Percent
Population
Percent
Under 5 years
1,592
7
25,970
7.6
5 to 9 years
1,745
7.6
28,746
8.4
10 to 14 years
1,773
7.8
28,599
8.4
15 to 19 years
1,452
6.4
25,554
7.5
20 to 24 years
1,118
4.9
19,938
5.8
25 to 34 years
3,048
13.3
43,419
12.7
35 to 44 years
4,096
17.9
59,099
17.3
45 to 54 years
3,217
14.1
47,221
13.8
55 to 59 years
1,150
5
16,100
4.7
60 to 64 years
815
3.6
11,536
3.4
65 to 74 years
1,505
6.6
18,256
5.3
75 to 84 years
1,038
4.5
12,294
3.6
85 years and over
317
1.4
4,635
1.4
Median Age
36.7
--
34.7
--
Source: U.S. census, 2000
Age Distribution
7%
22%
18%
41%
12%
Children Under 5
School children
(Ages 5-19)
Young adult
(Ages 20-34)
Adult
(Ages 35-64)
Senior Citizen
(Ages 65 and up)
Source: U.S. census, 2000
2.
Housing
It is important to regularly inventory housing characteristics and compare what exists
with current and future populations to determine if the Town’s housing stock is adequate
to meet their needs or to determine what changes, if any, need to be made or are desirable
to meeting planning goals.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 8
The Town of New Windsor has a large diversified housing stock consisting of 8,759 total
units (2000 U.S. Census) with a 4.1 percent vacancy rate (2000 census). Of the 8,396
occupied housing units, just over 70 percent are owner occupied while, conversely, just
under 29 percent are rental units (refer to Table 3). As noted later in this section, the total
housing stock has increased by about 20 percent since 2000.
Table 3 – Housing Stock, 2000
Units
Percentage
Vacant
363
4.1
Occupied
8,396
95.9
Seasonal/Occasional Use
70
0.8
Owner Occupied
5,917
70.5
Renter Occupied
2,479
29.5
Total Housing Units
8,759
--
Average Household Size
2.69
--
Source: 2000 U.S. Census
As is the case throughout Orange County, the majority of the Town’s housing units are
detached single family dwellings. The breakdown of attached units, as shown in Table 4,
may have changed since the 2000 census as a number of multi-family housing units have
been recently constructed within the Town.
Table 4 – Units in Structure, 2000
Type of dwelling
Units
Percentage
1-unit, detached
5,175
59.4
1-unit, attached
641
7.4
2 units
459
5.3
3 or 4 units
466
5.3
5 to 9 units
676
7.8
10 to 19 units
342
3.9
20 or more units
320
3.7
Mobile home
628
7.2
Boat, RV, van, etc.
7
0.1
Source: 2000 U.S. Census
Housing value within the Town, in 2000, was slightly lower than Orange County as a
whole in 2000 at $141,500. Approximately 78 percent of the homes within the Town are
priced between $100,000 and $199,999 with approximately 1 percent priced over
$300,000. In neighboring Rockland County, the median home value was approximately
$101,000 higher and it is generally agreed that it is one of the factors leading to the recent
influx of new residents to Orange County (refer to Tables 5 and 6).

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 9
Table 5 – Housing Value, 2000
Value
Units
Percentage
Less than $50,000
38
0.8
$50,000 to $99,999
561
11.9
$100,000 to $149,999
2,228
47.1
$150,000 to $199,999
1,471
31.1
$200,000 to $299,999
373
7.9
$300,000 to $499,999
24
0.5
$500,000 to $999,999
19
0.4
$1,000,000 or more
13
0.3
Source: 2000 U.S. Census
Housing Value, 2000
31.1%
47.1%
7.9%
0.5%
0.4%
11.9%
0.8%
0.3%
Less than $50,000
$50,000 to $99,999
$100,000 to $149,999
$150,000 to $199,999
$200,000 to $299,999
$300,000 to $499,999
$500,000 to $999,999
$1,000,000 or more
Source: 2000 U.S. Census
It should also be noted that the price range for condominium units in new developments
within the Town such as The Grove, are much higher than the previously mentioned
average home price starting at $345,000.
6
Table 6 – Median Home Value, 2000
New Windsor
$141,500
Orange County
$144,500
Rockland County
$242,500
Source: 2000 U.S. Census
6
According to developer K.Hovnanian Home Builders website

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 10
According to the Greater Hudson Valley Multiple Listing Service, the median price for
homes sold in New Windsor in 2005 was $310,000 and $313,900 in 2006. The County
median’s for these two recent years was $317,500 and $319,000 respectively.
Recent Development
Since 2000, there have been a number of residential developments constructed within the
Town. According to records in the Town’s Planning and Zoning Office, approximately
1,816 new housing units have either been built or have been proposed within the Town
over the last five years. This is equivalent to just over 20 percent of the total housing
stock from the 2000 census. Of this new development, approximately 1,337 units are
multi family dwellings.
Senior Citizen Housing Developments
There are currently two designated age-restricted developments within the Town which
restrict residents to ages 55 and older. A third age-restricted development known as
Benedict Pond, consisting of 120 units, has been approved by the Planning Board but is
subject to the water moratorium currently in place.
Presently there are five other proposed age-restricted developments before the Town
Board, Town Planning Board, or the Zoning Board of Appeals comprising of a total of
approximately 700 units.
Affordable Housing
The only designated “affordable” housing currently built within the Town is the New
Windsor Senior Housing project located in Vails Gate. In general, monthly housing costs
are in line with resident’s annual income. Less than 25 percent of Town residents spend
more than 30 percent of their annual income on housing related costs according to the
U.S. Census. This is similar to Orange County as a whole. However, a portion of those
paying more than 30 percent are families earning 80 percent or less of the Town’s median
income.
The term “affordable” is defined as housing that costs no more than 30 percent of a
homeowner’s monthly income and that is guaranteed to remain affordable for a period of
time to families who qualify under specific income guidelines (refer to Table 7).
Typically a qualifying household would need to earn less than 80 percent of the local
median income. Affordable housing can be age restricted or can be reserved for specific
groups such as municipal employees, emergency medical and fire fighting volunteers or
can simply be allocated to anyone meeting income requirements set by the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 11
Table 7 – Orange County HUD Eligibility Income Limits, 2007
Percent of Orange County Median Income
Family Size
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
1
$16,050
$21,400
$26,750
$32,100
$37,450
$41,300
2
$18,300
$24,440
$30,550
$36,660
$42,770
$47,200
3
$20,600
$27,520
$34,400
$41,280
$48,160
$53,100
4
$22,900
$30,560
$38,200
$45,840
$53,480
$59,000
5
$24,750
$33,000
$41,250
$49,500
$57,750
$63,700
6
$26,550
35,440
$44,300
$53,160
$62,020
$68,450
7
$28,400
$37,880
$47,350
$56,820
$66,290
$73,150
8
$30,250
$40,320
$50,400
$60,480
$70,560
$77,900
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Source: Orange County Office of Community Development
Table 8 indicates the maximum rents, including utilities that can be charged by a
landlord/developer in Orange County to qualify for Low Income Affordable Production
Program subsidies. These limits are set by HUD based on 65 percent of the County’s
median income.
Table 8 – Orange County Low Income Rent Limits Including Utilities, 2007
Bedrooms
Rent Limits*
1
$866.00
2
$1,060.00
3
$1,257.00
4
$1,383.00
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Source: Orange County Office of Community Development; HUD
* 65 percent of median income
There is some portion of the Town’s current population that would benefit from more
affordable housing.
3.
Residential Development Opportunities
A Geographic Information System (GIS) was utilized in an analysis of approximate
residential development potential and the likely population that could be generated if this
development were to occur in the Town in accordance with current Town zoning policies.
Development Potential Methodology
In order to assess residential development potential, privately owned vacant and over-
sized lots most susceptible to further development were identified. An assessment was
then made of the potential buildout of these lots under existing zoning. The development

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 12
potential analysis is intended to provide a “snapshot” of potential buildout under the
Town’s present regulatory environment.
County and Town-owned lands, transmission easements, quasi-public facilities, houses of
worship, cemeteries and land presently developed as multi-family residences were
assumed to have no potential for additional development.
Once the lots meeting the minimum lot size in their respective zoning districts were
identified, the next step was to identify the factors that would affect the development
potential of each lot. The factors considered included:
o The Town’s current zoning classifications;
o FEMA 100-year Floodplains;
o NYSDEC & NWI wetlands;
o Soils; and
o Waterbodies.
The extent of the known constraints are based on various sources of data including
mapping products acquired from the New York State Department of Environmental
Conservation (NYSDEC), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the
Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE), and the United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA), as well as subdivision applications previously submitted to the Town for
approval.
Environmental constraints were factored, with deductions on a parcel-by-parcel basis to
yield a net developable lot area. In determining residential development potential, the net
developable lot area was decreased by 15% to take into account space for the installation
of infrastructure and inefficiencies in lot layout; the remaining net developable lot area
was then divided by the minimum lot area of the respective district in which the property
was located to yield the potential number of additional residential development lots.
The deductions taken are as follows (based on assumption):
o Infrastructure – 15% deduction;
o FEMA 100-year Floodplains, NYSDEC & NWI wetlands, and waterbodies – 50%
of the land area of that portion of a parcel with constraints was counted as part of
minimum lot area.
Land Use & Zoning
The following residential zoning districts are found within the Town (refer to Figure 13):
o R-1 – 80,000 sq. ft. minimum lot size – not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot
(regardless of the availability of central water or central sewer)
o R-2 – 80,000 sq. ft. minimum lot size – not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot,
without central water and without central sewer

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 13
o R-3 – 80,000 sq. ft. minimum lot size for one-family – not to exceed 1 dwelling
on each lot (regardless of the availability of central water or central sewer); and
120,000 sq. ft. minimum for two-family – not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot
(regardless of the availability of central water or central sewer)
o R-4 – 43,560 sq. ft. minimum lot size - not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot
(regardless of the availability of central water or central sewer)
o R-5 – 43,560 sq. ft. minimum lot size for one-family; 65,000 sq. ft. minimum for
two-family – not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot (regardless of the availability of
central water or central sewer); and 5 acres (7,000 sq. ft. per unit) for multi-family
with both central water and sewer
o PO – 43,560 sq. ft. minimum lot size – not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot
(regardless of the availability of central water or central sewer)
o CL-1 – 12,500 sq. ft. minimum lot size – not to exceed 1 dwelling on each lot,
with both central water and central sewer
Development potential was calculated based on the most intense residential use permitted
in each of the respective zoning districts. The analysis assumes that all vacant land with
the potential for development in the PO zoning district would be used for residential uses.
Development Potential Analysis
Of the identified lots with the potential for further development, NYSDEC & NWI
wetlands and soil properties and conditions pose the greatest limitation on the additional
number of building lots that would be permitted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. FEMA 100-
year Floodplains and waterbodies also result in further limitations on development.
The analysis indicates there is the potential for an additional 3,350+/- residential dwelling
units in the Town under existing zoning, not including those presently approved by the
Planning Board. Approximately 1,350 additional dwelling units have been approved by
the Planning Board but have not yet been built. According to the 2000 U.S. Census the
average household size for the Town of New Windsor is 2.69 persons. If an additional
4,700 dwelling units were constructed in the Town, the population would increase by
approximately 12,650 persons, if family sizes remained the same, for a total population in
the Town of approximately 37,616 persons (refer to Table 9). This does not include
potential development under the Town’s senior citizen housing provision, which permits
9 to 18 dwelling units per acre.
A number of developments within the Town have been approved by the Town Planning
Board but have not yet been built because they are subject to the Town’s current water
moratorium (refer to Table 9) which was imposed by resolution of the Town Board on
January 3, 2003. This moratorium prohibits the extension of the Town’s existing water
mains, and as a result, prohibits new developments from connecting to the Town’s water
system unless adequate mitigation measures are implemented. In addition, the Town is
actively seeking to improve its water supply system. Towards that end, in August 2007
the Town entered into an agreement with the City of Newburgh to acquire up to an
additional 1,000,000 gpd of water from the City for various public and municipal
purposes which the Town can access and use in addition to the regular and usual supply

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 14
available from the New York City Catskill Aqueduct. The Town has also recently
applied for and received a permit from the NYSDEC to add additional water supply
wells, known as the St. Anne’s wells, to its water supply system.
Table 9 – Potential Residential Population
Description
Town of New Windsor
Town Population (2005)*
24,966
Potential Additional Residential Dwelling Units
3,350
Residential Dwelling Units Approved by Planning Board
(not yet built)
1,350
Additional Residents (2.69/DU – from 2000 Census)
12,650
Potential Future Population (under current zoning)
37,616
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Source: 2000 U.S. Census
* 2005 population is an estimate from the US Census Bureau
Table 10 below illustrates development potential in the Town broken down by current
zoning districts.
Table 10 – Residential Development Potential by Zoning District
Zoning District
Estimated Additional Dwelling Units
R-1
1,475
R-2
95
R-3
350
R-4
300
R-5
980
PI
125
PO
15
CL-1
0
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
The proposed adoption of the Comprehensive Plan and zoning amendments that will
ultimately implement the Plan are anticipated to result in a change in the total
development potential on the remaining developable parcels within the Town.
C.
Recommendations
1.
Neighborhood Quality
o Established residential portions of the Town should generally retain their existing
housing densities.
o Increase the permitted residential densities in the R-3 and R-4 zones. Potential
changes should take available water and sewer infrastructure into account.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 15
o Vegetative buffers should be created and or retained between developments and
local roadways and neighboring non-residential land uses in order to preserve the
rural residential character and scenic viewsheds within the Town. Requiring
buffers of 50 feet or more will help to achieve or retain neighborhood quality.
2.
Housing Production
o Encourage the production of housing appropriate to all segments of the
population, including lower, moderate, and upper income housing, to maintain a
balanced community. Consider variable zoning incentives and set asides to
achieve this objective.
o Developers of new subdivisions in the western portion of the Town should be
required to explore clustering as an option in order to conserve open space and
natural resources, create efficient infrastructure, including limiting the amount of
impervious surface, and provide diversity in housing. Cluster development may
be required at the discretion of the Planning Board. Cluster layouts should be
designed based on a specific formula to determine the best way for each specific
development to fit into the landscape based on the environmental features of each
specific site, as well as to contribute towards an open space and natural resource
protection system. The Town may provide incentives for development that
maintains at least 40 percent of open areas, and where open space contributes to
Town open space and natural resource protection policies.
Figure 2, Conservation Subdivision Design
Source: Rural by Design, Randall Arendt

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 16
o Senior citizen housing should be planned as part of the community where services
and utilities are available and where there is good access to transportation and
community services.
o The location of senior citizen housing in the Town should be limited to the
medium and high density residential zones identified on the Land Use Plan
(Figure 14). This would reduce potential incompatibility and the potential for
uncontrolled expansion of utilities into low density residential areas. It would
also help to reduce the potential of population growth that exceeds the capability
of services and infrastructure, including roads.
o The portion of the senior housing overlay district west of the Silver Stream
Reservoir should be eliminated from the newly revised senior housing law
adopted by the Town to reduce the intensity of development near the Reservoir, a
public drinking water source.
The newly revised senior housing law adopted by the Town allows for senior housing to
be developed solely within a redrawn and limited Senior Citizen Overlay District which
defines areas in the Town which are appropriate for age restricted developments. The
law does not differentiate between different types of facilities including independent
living, congregate care, assisted living, nursing homes, etc. which differ significantly and
should be addressed. Appropriate standards for each type of development should be
articulated in the ordinance.
o Establish a committee of senior citizens to keep abreast of the latest trends in
senior housing by identifying and investigating successful endeavors of other
municipalities. This committee could make periodic reports to the Town Board
on these matters with suggestions to achieve senior housing within the context of
the Town Plan.
o Use available federal, state, and local resources to support the production of
affordable housing.
o Coordinate building heights and floor area ratios (FAR) with set back
requirements in order to protect the integrity of neighborhoods. Larger homes
should be set back further from roadways and their scale should be consistent
with the neighborhood. This will protect neighborhoods from intrusion of
oversized houses not consistent with the neighborhood scale. Further, the Town
may wish to restrict building footprints by a percentage of lot size. This would
ensure that there is a sufficient area of the building lot for accessory uses (i.e.
pool, shed, etc.)
o Only require sidewalks in development that is of an appropriate density –
generally two units per acre or higher.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 17
Figure 3, Conservation Subdivision Design
Source: Rural by Design, Randall Arendt
Figure 4, Conservation Subdivision Design
Source: Conservation Design, Randall Arendt

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 18
o Develop a Conservation Cluster Overlay Zone that would allow for incentives in
the form of increased residential density in exchange for the preservation and/or
dedication of open space lands as part of a development. This overlay zone could
share the boundaries of the Town’s R-1, R-2, and R-3 zones and require the
preservation and protection of a determined percentage of lands to be developed
(e.g. 50%). If additional lands are preserved above the minimum base required,
increased density incentives could be provided on a sliding scale basis. Only
lands meeting minimum eligibility criteria would be considered for designation
for Conservation Cluster Development. Cluster development may be required at
the discretion of the Planning Board.
Conservation Subdivision Design
is a term coined by Randall Arendt. The concept uses
open space resources present on a site to be developed at the starting point for design.
The four-step process in designing a conservation subdivision include:
1. Identify conservation areas
2. Locate development lots
3. Align streets and trails
4. Draw in the lot lines
A
conservation easement
is a legal tool that ensures that conservation lands set aside as a
result of this process remain undeveloped.
Ownership options
for conservation lands include individuals, homeowner’s associations,
land conservancies, or the Town.
Source: Randall Arendt’s Conservation Design for Subdivisions: A Practical Guide to Creating
Open Space Networks (1996) and Growing Greener: Putting conservation into Local Plans and
Ordinances
(1999).

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 19
III.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
A.
Goals
Goal: Ensure a sound local economy which attracts investment, increases the tax base,
creates employment for Town residents and generates public revenues.
Goal: Establish 400 +/- acre special economic development area on Route 747 adjacent
to Stewart Airport as a high quality economic development zone.
Goal: Enhance and expand non-residential development to include infill along existing
mixed use corridors. Extend well designed commercial development into new areas
along heavily traveled routes (e.g. portions of Routes 207 and 300) in order to
encourage economic development while limiting unplanned and scattered strip
development.
Goal: Assure that new development meets high design standards and is well integrated
with existing development.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
In the year 2000 the Town had a total workforce of 10,837 defined as the employed
civilian population within the Town aged 16 and over. These workers are employed in
the following industries:
Table 11 – Employment by Industry, 2000
Industry
Number
Percentage
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Mining
110
1%
Construction
800
5.5%
Manufacturing
886
8.2%
Wholesale Trade
431
4%
Retail Trade
1544
14.2%
Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities
761
7%
Information
371
3.4%
Finance, Insurance, Real Estate
774
7.1%
Professional, Scientific, Management,
Administrative and Waste management
828
7.6%
Education, Health and Social Services
2494
23%
Arts, Entertainment, Recreation, Accommodation
and Food Service
663
6.1%
Public Administration
489
4.5%
Other Services
886
8.2%
Source: U.S. Census, 2000
Prepared by Turner Miller Group

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 20
The high percentage of employment in retail and education and health services reflects
the nature of the area’s major employers and the strong retail and service based economy.
The low employment in agriculture, on the other hand, reflects the diminishing role of
agriculture as an employer.
Unemployment within the Town for the same year (2000) was 2.8% equivalent to
approximately 483 individuals.
Median household income for residents of the Town was $51,113 this is slightly less than
the median household income for Orange County which was $52,058. While these
figures have undoubtedly increased for both Town and County, it is likely that the Town
is still close to the median, not significantly higher or lower.
C.
Recommendations
1.
Airport Related Development
o Develop a plan and zoning framework for the utilization of the 400+/- acre tract
of land adjacent to Stewart Airport that is not part of the Stewart State Forest.
The Town should encourage airport related development such as hotels,
conference centers, medical, educational, and high end research and office space
to be constructed in this area in an attractive, economically sustainable and
environmentally sensitive manner. It should reflect a combination of destination
uses that would benefit from the Airport and surrounding regional highway
system, and uses that will serve and support the immediate region.
o Large vegetative buffers in excess of 100 feet, to be determined by the Planning
Board, should be maintained between the airport and any development.
o Developments should retain as many mature trees as possible as to not reduce
existing noise and visual barriers.
2.
Other Major Economic Development Areas
o Generally, commercial and industrial development should be limited to areas
already developed including infill.
o Commercial and corporate development should generally be encouraged along
Route 207 from Toleman Road east to Union Avenue and from Route 300 to the
Five Corners Intersection to support the airport and further economic
development.
o Future non-residential development should be limited along residential corridors
along Route 207, generally west of Toleman Road, and other predominantly
residential corridors in order to maintain the rural and historic qualities of these
areas (see Land Use Plan).

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 21
o Develop public-private development relationships with major private landholders
along River Road and the Hudson River in an effort to redevelop areas of the
waterfront for public access, commercial (retail, office, restaurant, entertainment,
etc.), recreational, and mixed-use residential.
o Coordinate with the Orange County Partnership and Chamber of Commerce to
promote local business and quality employment in designated areas, particularly
in the eastern portion of the Town along major routes and thoroughfares.
3.
Design Guidelines
o Developments should be designed using natural materials and be developed at a
pedestrian scale. Roofs should be pitched or gabled and other architectural
elements should be incorporated whenever possible in order to reduce monotony,
create interesting development, and retain the attractiveness of corridors.
Example of façade projection and recess along Route 207
o The size of a development should be appropriate for its surroundings. Large
facades, over 100 feet in length, should be designed to visually reduce the mass of
the building.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 22
Figure 5
o Proximity of a development project to historic corridors or structures and rural or
scenic areas should be taken into consideration in design.
New development
should be designed to blend into the landscape in which it is being designed.
o Signage should be constructed of similar materials and color as the building to
which it is accessory. Pylon or pole signs should be avoided and monument signs
should only be permitted in cases where the Planning Board determines that a
building is not sufficiently visible from the roadway.
o Landscaping plans should be reviewed by the Planning Board during the planning
review process to ensure not only a mix of appropriate vegetation on the property
but also to ensure adequate screening from neighboring properties, around
parking areas and dumpster enclosures.
o Curb cuts should be minimized along congested commercial corridors and should
be set back from intersections.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 23
IV.
NATURAL RESOURCES
A.
Goals
Goal: Protect sensitive environmental areas and incorporate into an open
space/natural resource system.
Goal: Protect groundwater resources so that residents of the western portion of the
Town and areas without central water who will continue to utilize individual private
wells into the foreseeable future and are assured high quality water.
Goal: Mandate the protection and enhancement of surface waters, including public
water supplies, within the Town to promote environmental stewardship as well as
public recreational opportunities.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
There are environmentally sensitive features and areas present throughout the Town that
will need to be taken into consideration in developing the Plan (refer to Figure 6).
1.
Water resources
A major objective of the Comprehensive Plan is to accommodate future growth in a
manner that respects the Town’s environmental resources. New Windsor has the great
fortune to be located both in the Hudson River Valley which was recently named a
National Heritage Area and also located directly on the west bank of the scenic Hudson
River. The River is not only an important natural resource but the location of a number
of historic events dating back to the Revolutionary War. The river corridors have also
hosted much of the Town’s major industrial development within the 19
th
and 20
th
Centuries.
Washington Lake, Silver Stream Reservoir, and Beaverdam Lake are the Town’s major
waterbodies and are major sources of water supply. There are also a number of smaller
lakes and ponds throughout the Town. The Moodna and Quassaic Creeks are scenic
tributaries of the Hudson River which run through Orange County. The Moodna Creek
enters the Town in the southeast corner for a short distance as it meets the Hudson River.
The Quassaic enters the Town in the northeast corner from the City of Newburgh as it
meets the Hudson River.
Sand and Gravel aquifers are located throughout the central and eastern portions of the
Town (refer to Figure 6). They are not presently utilized as a primary source for public
and private water systems in the Town; however, their protection as important natural
resources is of paramount importance. The Town’s aquifers are recharged primarily from
infiltration of precipitation.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 24
2.
Wetlands and Floodplains
State and Federal wetlands are prevalent within the Town. Large tracts of wetlands exist
on the Stewart State Forest lands. Wetlands are also located along the banks of each of
the Town’s major and minor water bodies, at the mouth of the Moodna Creek where it
meets the Hudson River, and the majority of the land between Temple Hill Road and
Interstate 87, north of Mertes Lane. Smaller wetlands are scattered throughout the Town.
Wetlands are strictly regulated and are important as habitats, water quality and drainage
control.
It is also noted that in 2007 – 2008 the NYSDEC updated its wetland inventory maps for
portions of New Windsor.
FEMA 100 and 500 year flood plains are located along the bank of the Hudson River,
Beaver Dam Lake, and along the Moodna Creek. In addition to flooding hazards this
land should be considered critical to water quality as well.
3.
Significant Animal and Plant Habitats
According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s
(NYSDEC) Natural Heritage Program, the following species located within the Town are
listed by the State as Endangered or Threatened (refer to Tables 12 and 13 and Figure 7).
The Bald Eagle, known to be in the Moodna Creek Area, has been delisted by the State as
an endangered or threatened species; however, it remains protected under the Federal
Migratory Bird Act.
Table 12 – State Listed Animal Communities
Common Name
Latin Name
General Location
Indiana Bat
Myotis Sodalist
Southwestern Corner
Endangered
Shortnose Sturgeon
Acipenser Brevirostrum
Hudson River area
Threatened
Upland Sandpiper
Bartramia Longicauda
Stewart Forest
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Source: NYSDEC Natural Heritage Program 12/06
Table 13 – State Listed Plant Communities
Common Name
Latin Name
General Location
Least Bittern
Ixobrychus Exilis
Moodna Creek Area
Threatened
Spongy Arrowhead
Sagittaria
Montevidensis
Moodna Creek Area
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Source: NYSDEC Natural Heritage Program 12/06
The NYSDEC also identifies a number of other significant plant and fish habitats. These
include:

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 25
o Brackish Intertidal Mudflats;
o Brackish Tidal Mudflats;
o Anadromous Fish Concentration Area;
o Waterfowl Winter Concentration Area; and
o Tidal River Community.
These identified significant communities are all located in the Moodna Creek and Hudson
River watershed areas.
4.
Stewart Forest Lands
In addition to parkland, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
(NYSDEC) maintains open space, trails and natural habitats on Stewart Forest Lands in
the northwestern portion of the Town. In March of 1999 New York State transferred
approximately 5,110 acres of Stewart Land that was under the control of the New York
State Department of Transportation to the NYSDEC. In June of 2006, an additional
1,600 acres were transferred for a total of approximately 6,700 acres. This area is known
as a reforestation area called Stewart State Forest.
Currently, some agricultural uses still continue on the land with approximately 400 acres
bring leased for farming. The Orange County Historical Society maintains five historic
buildings along Route 207 and Route 208. The remainder of the land supports diverse
wildlife, including a number of rare species.
Stewart State Forest

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 26
C.
Recommendations
1.
Groundwater Resources
o Adopt aquifer protection regulations. Aquifer protection overlay zones delineated
by the boundaries of sand & gravel aquifers and their recharge areas should be
established in the Town. Regulations should regulate activities and developments
which can take place within the designated zones. The storage of fertilizers, toxic
chemicals, salt or coal should be prohibited and the use of pesticides as well as the
construction of water supply wells, and infiltration basins should be regulated in
these areas.
o Designate aquifers as critical environmental areas (CEA’s) as defined by the
regulations implementing the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act
(SEQRA). Actions within areas that are designated CEA’s are scrutinized more
closely to determine their potential impact on the CEA’s qualities and
characteristics. Regulations of this type will help to minimize the infiltration of
contaminants into groundwater.
o Enhance Stormwater Management practices within the Town. Regulations should
aim to reduce flood damage, soil erosion, and stormwater runoff, maintain
groundwater recharge, and minimize pollution of stormwater runoff in order to
maintain the integrity of local water resources. Regulations should include strict
erosion and sediment control standards such as the implementation of diversions,
sediment basins, or other similar structures prior to any on-site grading. All new
or replacement water supply or storm drain systems should be designed to
minimize infiltration.
o Adopt irrigation control regulations to control and reduce water used for lawn and
landscaping irrigation.
2.
Surface Water Resources
o Create watershed protection overlay zones delineated by the boundaries of the
drainage areas of the Silver Stream Reservoir and Washington Lake and generally
within 100 feet of the banks of ponds, creeks and streams in the Town. This
overlay should require special focus on site coverage and quality of runoff.
Special permits for construction, filling, excavation or grading will be required. It
should restrict certain development and vegetative clearing activities that might
degrade water quality. In addition, the buffer of open space that is created will
serve as a natural corridor for wildlife.
o Adopt environmental protection laws that protect all streams/creeks, waterbodies,
and floodplains in the Town and provide for a minimum required buffer area of
50 to 100 feet between the resource and development of any kind. These buffers
are generally measured from the bank of a stream. Setback distance should reflect

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 27
site specific environmental factors such as geology, slope, and type and quantity
of vegetation.
Moodna Creek Watershed Area in New Windsor
o Utilize available organizational and financial resources, within the budgetary
constraints of the Town to acquire/purchase additional watershed protection lands
directly adjoining the Silver Stream Reservoir. These lands should be kept as
open space to help protect the integrity of the watershed.
o Work jointly with the City of Newburgh to assist in the protection of City owned
watershed lands surrounding the Silver Stream Reservoir.
3.
Air Resources
o Continue to monitor local blasting protocols to determine if modifications are
needed.
o Develop initiatives to encourage the use of varied transportation modes, including
non-motorized modes of walking and bicycling when feasible, reducing vehicular
emissions. These include improving pedestrian access and safety at intersections,
particularly at the five corners intersection, and in and around commercial
development areas, (see traffic calming recommendations) and working with the
County to improve and expand Dial –a– Bus services, which may include the
development and maintenance of bus shelters.
o Institute an energy conservation program through the following measures:

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 28
Consumer education with information available at Town Hall and on the
Town website.
Require developers to explore the use of alternate forms of energy,
particularly in new commercial or residential buildings. This should
include solar lighting where appropriate. The County and State offer
grants and tax incentives for green design.
Encourage new one- or two-family dwelling or multifamily dwellings of
three stories or less to meet the requirements for a New York Energy Star
labeled home.
o Encourage local government to utilize green building and energy conservation
technologies and practices in the renovation and construction of municipal
buildings and facilities.
4.
Open Space
o Encourage alternative approaches to development including residential
conservation clustering on larger lots particularly within environmentally
sensitive areas and particularly in the western portion of the Town. Cluster
development may be required at the discretion of the Planning Board. Layouts
should be based on a specific formula intended to ensure appropriate density so
that dwelling units are sited appropriately and important open spaces are
preserved.
o Work cooperatively with the New York State Department of Environmental
Conservation in the preservation and protection of the Stewart Forest lands.
o Continue to explore creative strategies for the acquisition of open space,
particularly open space that contributes to the protection of natural resources and
sensitive environments. Methods may include dedication of open space during
subdivision, conservation cluster development with incentives for additional open
space, payment of a fee-in-lieu of dedication, gifting, transfer of development
rights, conservation easements and other methods deemed appropriate by the
Town.
o Explore methods of providing public pedestrian access to watershed protection
areas of Town’s ponds and reservoirs for canoeing, fishing, and other activities.
o Open space that is created or maintained by the design of a subdivision should
provide for connections to other similar open spaces.
o Work in conjunction with Orange County and the Palisades Interstate Park
Commission to protect the Moodna Creek Corridor by creating a greenway by
linking the Knox Headquarters and Butterhill Park properties with the Hudson
River along the Town’s southeast border.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 29
5.
Tree Preservation
o Draft and adopt a tree preservation law to help protect the Town’s woodland
character. For example, the Town should consider placing limitations on cutting
down trees in the public right-of-way and restricting clear cutting particularly
during site development.
o Work cooperatively with the Orange County and New York State departments of
transportation to ensure that trees are preserved or provided along County and
State routes within the Town.
o Explore sources of funding (i.e. grants) that would allow for the additional
planting of street trees and shrubs along public thoroughfares.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 30
V.
TRANSPORTATION
A.
Goals
Goal: Improve the functionality of major arterials without major expansion of roads.
Goal: Create or support efforts to connect Stewart Airport to the regional road and
transportation system in order to enhance the airport and limit traffic on local roads.
Goal: Expand local bus service to connect the Town’s population centers to
commercial and major employment areas.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
The community’s transportation system is closely linked to the Town’s land use pattern
and to the local quality of life. It is essential to the economic health of a community as
well as the ability to link people with jobs and services.
Major planning for transportation systems and infrastructure in the area is the
responsibility of the Orange County Transportation Council (OCTC). They are also the
Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for Orange County. They are responsible for
transit system coordination, certain transportation planning functions, and creating a
transportation capital improvement program for the County that consists of the following
elements:
o Unified Planning Work Program (annual);
o Long Range Transportation Plan (every four years); and
o Transportation Improvement Program (every two years).
The following road improvements are scheduled to take place within the Town as
reported in the OCTC 2006-2010 Transportation Improvement Program:
o Lake Road rehab from railroad bridge to the Town of Blooming Grove Town line;
o Jackson Avenue reconstruction from Route 207 to the Town of Cornwall town
line; and
o Construction of a continuous left turn lane along Route 207 from Bruenig Road
(Stewart Airport) to Route 300.
1.
Road Network
There are over 90 miles of Town roads within New Windsor which are maintained by the
Town Highway Department. The Department also maintains six miles of County-owned
roadways consisting of Union Avenue (Route 69) and Forge Hill Road (Route 74). The
NYSDOT maintains major state highways within the Town including NYS Routes 300,
207, 747, 94 and U.S. Route 9W. The Town’s only expressway, the New York State
Thruway, is maintained by the Thruway Authority. There is no direct access to the
Thruway within the Town. NYS Route 207 (Little Britain Road) which extends from the

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 31
Town of Hamptonburgh to the east side of Washington Lake in the Town of Newburgh
and Route 94 (Blooming Grove Turnpike) are the only major east/west thoroughfares
within the Town. The NYS Thruway runs north/south but with no interchange within the
Town, NYS Route 300, Windsor Highway (Route 32), and U.S. Route 9W are more
practical for local north/south travel. The State has completed the construction of Route
747, the new alignment of Drury Lane to connect Interstate 84 with Stewart Airport (refer
to Figure 8).
The function of the various roadways as freeways and major arterials (regional),
collectors (connecting arterials and sections of the community) and local roads (generally
serving neighborhoods) usually reflects the level of government responsibility. For
purposes of planning the road classifications reflect this current arrangement.
With the exception of the NYS Thruway and U.S. Route 9W, all roads within the Town
provide one moving lane in each direction with additional turning lanes at some major
intersections. The largest intersection, known locally as Five Corners (intersection of
Route 300, Route 32, including Windsor Highway, and Route 94) has been repeatedly
cited as having congestion problems and needing improvements; however, some
improvements have been implemented, including non-signalized turning lanes as a result
of the Hannaford’s project.
2.
Automobile Traffic
Despite recent efforts by the County to increase bus routes and park & ride opportunities
82 percent of Town residents drive alone to and from work while only 13.4 percent
carpool or use public transportation (2000 census). The median travel time to work for
Town residents was 38 minutes in 2000. This number has been steadily increasing with
population increases that have occurred county-wide. These numbers are likely to
change now that the State has completed the construction of Route 747, the new
alignment of Drury Lane to connect Interstate 84 with Stewart Airport. Also increasing
is the percentage of the population that travels outside the County for employment.
According to the Orange County Long Range Transportation Plan, as of 2003, 26 percent
of County residents commuted to work outside of Orange County with the majority
traveling to Rockland County followed by Westchester County and New York City. The
Orange County Transportation Council has recently approved a Town wide traffic study.
Traffic counts, obtained from the Orange County Planning Department, show that since
1980 traffic has increased on all major roads within the Town. The largest increases are
along Route 207 where between 1980 and 2002 traffic within the Town increased an
average of over 137 percent, or 4.2 percent annually. Traffic in this area will most likely
continue to be a problem with the impending expansion of Stewart Airport although
alternate access routes to the airport from the north may limit new airport traffic on local
roads.
The data also shows that traffic around the Five Corners intersection has also increased
over the last 20 years with the greatest increase occurring along Route 300 (Temple Hill

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 32
Road) between the five corners intersection in Vails Gate and the intersection with Route
207.
Table 14 – Traffic Volumes, 1980 – 2002
Average Annual Daily Vehicle
Route
From
To
Trips
1980
1990
2000
2002
Percent
Change
Percent
Change
per Year
Rt. 32
5 Corners
Union
Ave
12,080
13,350
12,777
13,194
5.77%
0.28%
Rt. 94
5 Corners
Willow
Ln.
6,750
9,050
10,170
N/A
50.67%
2.07%
Rt. 94
Willow
Ln.
Rt. 9W
6,750
6,050
7,500
10,183
11.11%
0.53%
Rt. 207
CR 54 /
SR 747.
Breunig
Rd.
4,850
9,150
9,096
9,551
87.55%
3.19%
Rt. 207
Breunig
Rd.
Union
Ave.
4,570
17,700
15,846
15,629
246.74%
6.41%
Rt. 207
Union
Ave.
Rt. 207 /
300 split
12,700
18,210
22,692
N/A
78.68%
2.94%
Rt. 300
5 Corners
Rt. 207
9,050
12,250
16,066
15,669
77.52%
2.91%
Average
137.52%
2.91%
Source: Orange County Department of Planning
Prepared by: Turner Miller Group
3.
Transit
Bus
Bus transit currently serves two primary client groups: 1. commuters to New York City
and other areas outside the immediate community and 2. the transit-dependent public that
has limited alternative means of transportation to local services or employment. Service
is provided in Orange County through regional, local, and Dial-a-Bus services.
Fixed route bus service is of three main types: 1. regional inter-county service including
commuter service, 2. intra-county transportation, and 3. local services in major
population centers. The local routes are largely limited to service within commercial and
retail areas in and around the cities of Newburgh and Middletown and the Villages of
Monroe and Kiryas Joel. New routes are occasionally introduced if demand warrants.
The Newburgh-Beacon Bus Corporation has operated two local routes in the City of
Newburgh and its environs for many years. Service is provided within the City as well as
to the Newburgh Mall and Wal-Mart on Route 300, the Shop-Rite on Route 32, and the
Vails Gate shopping areas. Under contract with the NYSDOT the Corporation also
operates a route connecting Stewart Airport with downtown Newburgh and the Metro-
North Railroad Beacon Station.
Short Line Bus service operated by Coach USA provides service between Orange and
Rockland Counties and New York City at times traveling as far west as Port Jervis. Bus

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 33
stops convenient to New WIndsor residents includes multiple daily stops in Vails Gate at
the Five Corners Intersection of Routes 300, 94 and 32, and a stop at the Stewart Airport
Park and Ride lot.
Coach USA also provides local service within Orange, Sullivan, and Ulster Counties
between larger population and commercial centers. Local Service includes service
between the following:
o Tuxedo and Middletown via Route 17M.*
o Newburgh and Middletown via Route 17K.
o Kerhonkson (Ulster County) and Monroe via Route 209.*
o Harriman and Newburgh via Route 32 which includes a stop in Vails Gate at the
Five Corners Intersection.
o Bear Mountain to Newburgh.*
* Do not serve New Windsor directly.
Dial-a-Bus Services
There are presently nine Dial-a-Bus services in Orange County, all municipally-operated.
Dial-a-Bus services are non-fixed route systems that provide transportation services to
meet the needs of the general public as well as particular individuals such as the disabled
and elderly. The operations are all small but they provide an essential service for the
transit dependent. In New Windsor, Dial-a-Bus services run from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
Monday through Friday. Service is provided throughout the Towns of New Windsor and
Cornwall and the City of Newburgh.
4.
Trucking / Freight
The major freight, distribution, and warehousing operations for Orange County are
clustered near I-84 in Montgomery (Exit 5), near I-84 and I-87 close to Stewart Airport in
the Towns of Newburgh and New Windsor, and near NY Route 17 (future I-86) in the
Town of Chester. Truck traffic frequently travels through New Windsor when traveling
from these warehouses to major routes. As Stewart Airport expands freight, distribution,
and warehousing facilities along with truck traffic will likely increase. However, the new
Route 747 Interchange that has been constructed has been effective at alleviating a
portion of truck traffic traveling through the Town.
5.
Stewart Airport
Stewart Airport is a major regional transportation facility whose role in the regional
transportation system as both a passenger and freight facility will impact growth in the
Town and region.
Stewart Airport currently has two runways, the larger of which, at 11,818 feet long and
150 feet wide, is one of the longest in the Northeast. The terminal was originally

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 34
constructed as a military hangar, but has been modified to its current size of 110,000
square feet on two levels with eight departure gates.
In addition to the airfield and passenger terminal, Stewart Airport also contains a cargo
terminal, general aviation hangars, fuel farms, an air traffic control tower, a U.S. Animal
Import Center, an industrial park, and is home to several military posts.
Access to Stewart Airport is provided via two separate routes: Breunig Road off of NYS
Route 207 and International Boulevard off of NYS Route 747. Breunig Road is a three-
lane roadway which originates at the signalized intersection with NYS Route 207 and
goes north to the terminal. NYS Route 207 is a two-lane highway running east-west
along the southern boundary of the Airport. The project to provide new access from I-84
via the new interchange at NYS Route 747 and International Boulevard to the airport was
completed in 2008.
New International Blvd. Entrance to Stewart Airport off of NYS Route 747
The planned expansion of Stewart Airport is likely to generate demand for additional
development. The extent to which the Town can shape or influence this development is
an important consideration in the Town Plan.
Air Cargo
Stewart Airport handles a variety of cargo from oversize freight, to express packages, to
livestock. In 1989 34,576 tons of cargo were shipped from Stewart Airport. This total
more than doubled to 79,555 by 1996.
7
The development of land around the surrounding
area and the provision of air cargo storage and handling facilities at the Airport will likely
spur additional growth.
7
According to Orange County Transportation Council’s Draft Long Range Transportation Plan 2/07.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 35
Breunig Road Entrance to Stewart Airport off of Little Britain Road (Rt. 207).
Airport Master Plan
Stewart Airport completed its master plan in 2006 which will guide its upcoming
expansion. The plan lays out a new vision for the airport focused on transforming the
airport into a world-class aviation center for passengers, cargo, and corporate activity
serving the Hudson Valley and the New York Metropolitan area.
The Airport Activity Forecast in the Master Plan estimates that passenger service will
expand by approximately 339 percent from the 2002 passenger total of 181,339 to
approximately 798,000 passengers in 2022.
8
The following roadway improvements are recommended as part of the Stewart Airport
Master Plan and are intended to segregate local and airport traffic:
o Construction of a loop road extension which would extend Circulation Drive to
the south to align with the proposed east/west connector. To avoid the need for a
traffic signal, a modern roundabout is recommended at the intersection of Breunig
and Circulation Drive.
The Plan also recommends an extension of the Metro-North Railroad commuter rail to
the passenger terminal via a aerial viaduct. Although, actual rail alignment and planning
would be determined by the Railroad, the Plan recommends connecting to the existing
Port Jervis Line, near Salisbury Mills. The Port Jervis Line terminates in Hoboken, New
8
Projected by the Stewart International Airport Master Plan Update. This number represents the moderate growth
model, higher estimates were attained with a robust model and lower estimates with a base model.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 36
Jersey, where connections via PATH to New York City’s Penn Station and Herald Square
are available. There is also a transfer from Secaucus, New Jersey to Penn Station.
Other on-site upgrades would include an expansion and internal reconfiguration of the
existing passenger terminal, adding two additional taxiways and improvement of cargo
and general support facilities.
6.
Traffic Safety & Vehicular Accidents
Accident and injury data which often reflects the degree of safety design issues at
intersections was obtained from the Town Police Department for major intersections
within the Town. The following data was reported (refer to Tables 15 and 16):
Table 15 – Vehicular Accidents at Major Intersections, 2001 – 2006
Intersection
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Totals
Five Corners
16
8
14
16
21
15
90
Rt. 300 & Rt.
207
4
5
9
12
14
6
50
Windsor Hwy.
(Rt. 32) &
Union Ave.
6
5
7
6
10
9
43
Blooming
Grove Tpk.
(Rt. 94) & Rt.
9W
4
2
5
1
1
4
17
Source: Town of New Windsor Police Department
Prepared by: Turner Miller Group
As the data indicates, the highest number of accidents both annually and total over the
evaluated six year period were recorded at the Five Corners Intersection (shown below).
This intersection is also the location with the highest number of serious accidents as
indicated by the number of injuries reported. There were no fatalities recorded at any of
these intersections during the years studied.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 37
Five Corners Intersection at Vails Gate
Table 16 – Vehicular Injuries at Major Intersections, 2001 – 2006
Intersection
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Totals
Five Corners
5
1
4
5
1
2
18
Rt. 300 & Rt.
207
1
1
3
3
3
1
12
Windsor Hwy.
(Rt. 32) &
Union Ave.
1
1
3
1
3
0
9
Blooming
Grove Tpk.
(Rt. 94) & Rt.
9W
1
2
0
1
0
2
6
Source: Town of New Windsor Police Department
Prepared by: Turner Miller Group
Much of the traffic volume on the Town’s major arteries is generated from outside of the
Town so that while the Town can address traffic reduction in the Plan, the approach to
congestion and safety improvements requires coordination among various levels of
government. Among the approaches to consider are expanded mass-transit opportunities.
C.
Recommendations
1.
Roads
o Require new subdivisions to connect to other local roads and adjacent
subdivisions within the Town and discourage the use of cul-de-sacs in order to aid
in circulation and keeping unnecessary traffic off major roadways. All new

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 38
connections should be unrestricted access. Techniques, such as traffic calming
methods described below, should be implemented to ensure local neighborhood
roadways are impacted as little as possible by through traffic.
o Urge County and the NYSDOT to construct turning lanes where appropriate on
major roadways as recommended in the NYSDOT Master Plan.
o Perform a traffic and pedestrian safety analysis of the Five Corners Intersection.
Provide crosswalks at the Intersection.
o Pursue a connection of Routes 300 and 94 and Routes 300 and 32 by establishing
bypasses around the Five Corners Intersection. Pursue similar proposals where
opportunity exists.
o Reduce access points along major roads and encourage joint use of curb cuts and
marginal access drives.
o Create highway improvement overlay zones along:
Route 300 and Route 207 from the five corners intersection to and
including Route 747.
Route 94, from the five corners intersection a short distance southwest to
the Thruway overpass.
Route 94, from the five corners intersection to the Newburgh City line.
Route 32, from the five corners intersection to the Newburgh City line.
Oil tank farms on River Road
The highway improvement overlay zone should be designed to require developers
to adhere to stricter guidelines and standards related to landscaping, design,
setbacks, and access control.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 39
o In creating these highway improvement overlay provisions, it is suggested that
issues related to lots bisected by zoning lines and provisions for buffers between
commercial and residential uses be addressed. Wherever possible and practical
zoning district boundaries should run along lot lines.
2.
Public Transportation
o Encourage the County to fund additional Dial-A-Bus service.
o Explore ways to increase access to bus service in the Town by expanding the
number of bus routes and stops. An emphasis should be placed on providing
transportation to Town parks and recreational facilities, major commercial and
employment areas, and regional mass transit such as park & ride locations.
o Encourage the development and maintenance of bus shelters along existing bus
routes throughout the Town
3.
Traffic Calming
o Identify areas within the Town where traffic calming is appropriate due to
excessive speed, congestion or high levels of pedestrian activity.
Both
commercial areas as well as intersections close to schools and recreational uses
should be closely evaluated.
o Design and implement traffic calming techniques where deemed appropriate such
as lower speed limits, narrow lane widths, and applying one or more physical
traffic calming techniques such as rumble strips, speed bumps, paved or planted
islands, or textured or painted cross walks.
o Apply necessary signage in conjunction with traffic calming techniques especially
at known pedestrian crossings and near schools and recreation lands.
o Reduce speed limits where appropriate. For the most part, this will require
coordination with County and NYSDOT.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 40

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 41
VI.
PARKS, RECREATION, & HISTORIC RESOURCES
A.
Goals
Goal: Assure access to a wide variety of open space and recreation facilities for
residents in all parts of Town.
Goal: Protect architecturally and historically significant structures, sites, streets and
corridors – a source of community identity, and social and economic vitality.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
Parks, Recreation, and open space lands are located throughout the Town and are owned
and maintained by a number of local and regional agencies (refer to Figure 9).
1.
Local Parks
The Town of New Windsor has an extensive network of parks and recreation facilities
which is continuing to expand. The Town maintains approximately 135 acres of parkland
which supports a number of facilities such as sports fields, tennis courts, playgrounds,
picnic areas and natural open spaces (refer to Table 17 below). The largest and most
recently constructed, Mt Airy Sports Complex, is still undergoing improvements. When
completed, the complex will contain a gymnasium, playground, sports fields, tennis
courts, softball fields, walking trails, and a concession area. According to the Director of
the Parks and Recreation Department, the Town is currently in the process of collecting
data on park capacity and patronage at the Town’s facilities. This information plus an
analysis of park locations and accessibility in relation to population will assist in
developing and refining recommendations for the Comprehensive Plan.
Generally accepted standards suggest 10 acres of local parks per one-thousand
population. Equally if not more important than an average standard is the range of
facilities and their accessibility. While the combination of Town, County, and school
district sites exceeds this standard, expanded facilities will likely be needed as the Town
grows, particularly in newly developing areas.
2.
New York State Parks
In 1988 New York State purchased 102 acres within the Town overlooking the Hudson
River known as the Kowawese Unique Area at Plum Point. Maintained by Orange
County, this site boasts scenic views of the Hudson River and over 2,000 feet of sandy
shoreline as well as hiking trails and a picnic area. Crestview Lake Park is also owned by
New York State, but is now the location of a new through road from Route 747 to
Stewart Airport.
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) maintains
open space, trails and natural habitats on Stewart Forest Lands in the northwestern
portion of the Town. In March of 1999 New York State transferred approximately 5,110

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 42
acres of Stewart Land that was under the control of the New York State Department of
Transportation to the NYSDEC. In June of 2006, an additional 1,600 acres were
transferred for a total of approximately 6,700 acres. This area is known as a reforestation
area called Stewart State Forest.
Kowawese Unique Area at Plum Point
3.
School Facilities
In addition to municipal parks, the Town’s school districts maintain recreation facilities
and open space within the Town for use by the district’s school children. The following
schools are located within the Town and offer facilities such as sports fields, playground
equipment and open space.
o Little Britain Elementary, Washingtonville School District.
o Heritage Junior High School, Newburgh Enlarged City School District.
o New Windsor Elementary School, Newburgh Enlarged City School District.
o Vales Gate Elementary School, Newburgh Enlarged City School District.
o Temple Hill Academy, Newburgh Enlarged City School District.
Often these facilities are available for public use during non-school hours.
4.
Private Recreational Facilities
The following private recreational facilities are located within the Town:
o New Windsor Golf Course – Located off of Bethlehem Road.
o New Windsor Little League – Baseball fields located off of Cedar Avenue.
o Washingtonville Soccer Club – Soccer fields located off of Shaw Road.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 43
Table 17 – Town of New Windsor Parks
Park
Size
Location
Facilities
Mount Airy Sports
Complex
40.9 Acres
Mount Airy Road off of
Route 94
Playground and sports
fields with more under
construction
Plum Point Park
6.8 Acres
Route 9W
Scenic views, play area,
pavilion, and picnic
areas
Ruscitti Park
4.1 Acres
Union Avenue
Softball field, basketball
court, playground, and
pavilion
San Giacomo Park
9 Acres
Union Avenue
Four tennis courts, play
area, baseball field, and
basketball courts
Butterhill Park
38.2 Acres
Creamery Drive at
Guernsey Drive
Small play area and
open grassy area.
Beaver Dam Park
4.3 Acres
Chestnut Avenue
Small playground with
benches and basketball
court
Bull Road Park
40,000 sq ft
Bull Road
Basketball court & small
grassy area
Town Cantonment
Lands
71.1 Acres
Route 300
Reproduction
Revolutionary War
Cabins
NYS Park Facilities Managed by Orange County & NYSDEC
Kowawese Unique Area
102 Acres
Rt. 9W on the Hudson
River
Boating, fishing, biking,
nature trails, & picnic
area
Crestview Lake Park
+/- 25 Acres
James A. Kelly Drive
Swimming, playground,
open area with scenic
views (not currently
utilized).
Stewart State Forest
+/- 6,700 Acres
Northwest portion of
Town
walking, running,
mountain biking,
horseback riding, bird
watching
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
5.
Orange County Park & Open Space Plans
Parkland and open space are important for the Town, as well as the County as a whole to
maintain its rural character as well as enhance the quality of life of its residents. Orange
County, in its Open Space Plan of 2004, asserts that open space has great social,
environmental, and economic benefits and it should be considered a service just as
education or transportation infrastructure.
9
The County plan presents the following
recommendations based on a series of meetings with interested groups, individuals, and
County and local elected officials:
o Preserve open space and unique natural lands;
9
Orange County 2004 Open Space Plan.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 44
o Improve recreational opportunities by increasing facilities and services;
o Improve the availability of linked, interconnecting trails for access to cultural and
natural resources;
o Increase public access to natural and cultural history programs and services;
o Develop County-wide facilities for cultural education;
o Protect and preserve historic properties;
o Provide more parks in urban areas; and
o Preserve farmlands and related operations.
6.
Sidewalks
Sidewalks can and do provide an important recreational benefit to the Town, when
appropriately sited. The Town of New Windsor Subdivision of Land Law Section 257-
24(B) gives the Planning Board the authority to waive sidewalks during the subdivision
review process. Generally speaking, sidewalks can serve as critical links in the
transportation network providing pedestrian access to commercial districts, schools,
businesses, government offices, and recreation areas. A good system of sidewalks may
allow older pedestrians who are no longer able to drive, a continued independent
lifestyle. Sidewalks can be gathering places in neighborhoods and business districts, and
offer space for families and friends to walk and socialize together. Well-maintained
sidewalks encourage exercise and provide the benefits of a healthy lifestyle.
The appropriateness of requiring sidewalks in new subdivisions in the Town should be
selected carefully to maximize their usefulness to the community. New Windsor is
notable for a having a mix of more or less dense development and it is important to
preserve the rural nature of the outlying areas of the Town. In those areas, sidewalks
might provide fewer benefits, especially in areas where there are no adjoining or nearby
amenities or other communities that could be connected by a system of sidewalks.
Sidewalks in those areas would be inadequate or inappropriate to the community's needs,
and as such would amount to an inefficient use of money and resources.
The waiver of sidewalks may provide a cost benefit to the developer. Under the Town's
current fee schedule, there is no differentiation between projects with and without
sidewalks for per-lot recreation fees.
7.
Historic Resources
The Town of New Windsor has a rich historic background with numerous historic sites
and buildings. Three properties are listed on the State and National Historic Register and
many are of local interest and importance (refer to Table 18). It is important to preserve
this history to the greatest extent possible. The preservation of historic structures and
sites not only adds to the unique character and sense of place of a particular area but also
spurs economic activity through tourism.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 45
Table 18 – Listed Historic Structures
Name
Original Construction
Location
Edmonston House
1755
1042 Rt. 94
Cantonment*
1782
Rt. 300
Cantonment Officer's Hut*
1783
Rt. 300
Last Encampment of the
Continental Army*
1782
Rt. 300
General Knox's Headquarters*
1754
Forge Hill Rd
Dr. John Nicoll House
1735
2882 Rt. 9W
General James Clinton House **
1798
Rt. 207 across from Beattie Rd.
George Denniston House **
c.1770
Rt. 207
Denniston House
c. 1825
505 Jackson Ave
Dr. Moses Higby House
c.1770
170 Union Ave
Major William Telford Tavern **
1759
Rt. 207
John Haskell House***
c.1720
Windsor Hwy off Rt. 32
Woodburn Hall
1825
117 Sandpiper Ln.
John Bull House
1856
Bull Rd, south of 207
Jacob Mills House
1770
Rt. 207, west of Moores Mill Rd.
St. Thomas Episcopal Church
1847
Old 9W
Elmwood School #6 **
1869
Rt. 207 at Route 747
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
* Listed on NYS Historic Register
** Maintained by Orange County Historical Society
*** Listed in Historic American Building Survey
Currently the Town has two established Historic Corridors which are focused around the
two New York State Historic Sites; Knox Headquarters and the New Windsor
Cantonment. The boundaries of the two corridors are as follows:
o New Windsor Cantonment Historical Corridor: This corridor runs from the New
York State Thruway Overpass on Route 207 (Little Britain Road) in a
southeasterly direction along Routes 207 and 300 (Temple Hill Road), to the
intersection of Route 300 and Old Temple Hill Road. The extent of the district is
400 feet on each side of the right-of-way line of the designated road.
o Knox Headquarters Historical Corridor: This corridor runs from the intersection
of Route 94 (Blooming Grove Turnpike) in an easterly direction along Forge Hill
Road to the intersection of Forge Hill Road and Route 9W. The extent of the
district is 400 feet on each side of the right-of-way of the designated road.
According to the Town Zoning Code the Town can impose special conditions and
restriction on these two districts, “For the protection, enhancement, perpetuation…” of

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 46
the two areas. However, outside of this delineation of district boundaries, the Zoning
does not further regulate historic structures nor does it regulate development adjacent to
historic sites or corridors.
Haskell House (c. 1720)
The majority of the historic properties within the Town are privately owned as it is
typically not economically feasible for municipal agencies to maintain them. As such,
many of the historic sites have been renovated or altered to meet the changing needs of
their owners over time. Currently there are no regulations in the Town Code against
altering or demolishing historic structures that have not been listed on the State or
National Historic Registers.
County Maintained Properties
In 2001 the NYSDEC transferred ownership rights of four New Windsor properties from
New York State to the Orange County Historical Society (OCHS). These properties, all
on Stewart Forest Lands along Route 207, had previously been threatened by demolition
for a number of years when bulldozers cleared land for Stewart Airport and when the
State determined it would be more economical to tear them down. Each of the properties
are rented out to residential tenants whose rent pays for the structures’ upkeep. OCHS
offers tours occasionally with tenants’ consent.
Architectural Survey
Colette Fulton, with assistance from the Town Historian, put together an architectural
survey for the Town in 1988. This is a collection of raw data obtained from old maps,
books, interviews with homeowners and descendents of historic persons. The survey
consists of 91 historic structures in total. Many of the buildings were constructed and
played important roles during the Revolutionary War period, the most prominent being
the New Windsor Cantonment, the Last Encampment of the Continental Army and
Knox’s Headquarters. (Refer to Table 19 for a list of important homes of distinction.)

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 47
Three of the buildings included in the survey have been torn down or destroyed since the
survey was completed and other structures have since had their historic character
compromised by alterations made by homeowners over the years. Some of the homes
have been well-maintained or restored by their owners to resemble their original
appearance character.
Table 19 – Local Homes of Distinction
House Name
Original
Construction
Location
Linden – Leonard Nicoll House
1842
113 Rt 9W
Thomas McDowell House
1750
637 Jackson Ave
“Stonefield” – Moffat’s Academy
1745
west side of station rd, south of Rt 207
Terwilliger – Wixon House
1790
East side of Bull Rd at 207
Lockwood House
c. 1800
748 Union Ave.
Stewart – Weed House
c. 1780
East side of Station Rd, south of rail road
tracks
Williams – Roe House
c. 1780
67 Forge Hill Rd.
Uzal Knapp House
c. 1780
1733 Little Britain Rd.
Jacob Schultz House
1792
west side of Bethlehem Rd at Mt Airy Rd.
Topping House
c. 1840
east side of Station Rd, south of Rt 207
Welling House
1765
East side of Toleman Rd.
Denniston/Wallace House
1856
East side of Station Rd. South of Rt 207
French – Furdeen House
c. 1835
West side of S. Jackson Ave, south of Rt
207
Denniston – Corwin House
c. 1790
North side of Lake Rd just west of S.
Jackson Ave.
Denniston Tennant House
c. 1870
575 Jackson Ave.
Elfwood
(currently the McQuade Foundation)
c. 1870
621 Blooming Grove Tpk
John Ellison Store
c. 1790
815 Rt. 94
Denniston – Dean House
1829
North side Dean Hill Rd
Beatie House
c. 1835
345 Beatie Rd
William Sayer House
1847
East side N. Jackson Ave (MTA property)
Dickson House
c. 1800
392 Union Ave
McCullough House
1929
9 St. Joseph's Pl.
Appleton – Morse
c. 1770
12 Union Ave.
Appleton – Morse #2
c. 1770
16 Union Ave.
Fresh Air Home
1872
8 Lush Lane
James “Squire” Patton
c. 1790
256 Little Britain Rd.
Connolly House
1915
252 Walsh Ave.
Dennis Coan House
1930
59 Silver Spring Rd
Higgins Houses
c. 1880
62 Silver Spring Rd
Quassaick Avenue District Mansions

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 48
Roe - Brewster House
1870
11 Oakridge Dr.
Stonecrest Mansion
1872
11 Stonecrest Dr.
Stonecrest Carriage House & Barn
unknown
S. Stonecrest Dr.
Ten Broeck House
1870
257 Walsh Ave
Glenhurst
1890
145 Quassaick Ave
Mountain View
1884
Tree Haven Lane
Cedar Crest
1881
176 Quassaick Ave
Clark - Zeigler House
c.1820
Fanewood Dr.
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Thomas McDowell House (c.1750)
Quassaick Avenue Mansions
Quassaick Avenue area contains a number of Victorian-style mansions that were
constructed in the late 1800’s which have survived well over time. Today these mansions
are surrounded by a modest neighborhood with homes set on the lands which were once
used as great gardens and promenades for the wealthy landowners. The homes are still
used for residential purposes. Some have been converted to multi-family units.
C.
Recommendations
1.
Park Lands
o Explore opportunities for emerging recreational needs including but not limited to
skateboarding, equestrian trails, etc.
o Emphasis should be placed on maintaining and/or enhancing the physical
condition of parks where appropriate.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 49
o Expand physical access to the Hudson River where possible.
o Additional access to the river, including a potential boat-launch should be
included in future redevelopment of waterfront lands.
o As development expands into the western portion of Town, additional recreational
sites and needs should be assessed. Consideration should be given to accessibility
to newly developing areas. This can be achieved through the development
process.
o The appropriateness of requiring sidewalks in new subdivisions in the Town
should be selected carefully to maximize their usefulness to the community.
o In subdivisions where sidewalks are deemed inappropriate, additional recreational
facilities should be considered to offset the loss of the recreational benefits
associated with sidewalks. Future residents of those subdivisions could take
advantage of other recreational facilities, especially Town park facilities, to meet
their recreational needs.
o The Town should consider amending its fee schedule to increase the recreation
fee for projects where the Planning Board has waived the required sidewalks.
This will offset the loss of recreational opportunities provided by sidewalks, and
will also enhance the Town's available resources for Town recreational facilities
to meet the recreational needs of the new homes.
2.
Architectural Survey
o Perform a comprehensive update to the architectural survey conducted in 1988 by
Colette Fulton, with assistance from the Town Historian. A number of buildings
included in the survey have been torn down, or destroyed since the survey was
completed and other structures have had their historic character compromised by
alterations made by homeowners over the years.
3.
Historic Preservation
o Vegetative buffers should be required to protect historic developments and their
surrounding viewsheds from new developments.
o Create a program that could provide positive recognition to historic resources in
the Town identified as important or significant by an updated architectural survey.
For example, a historic plaques program could be initiated to identify historic
structures.
o Encourage property owners to list their eligible properties on the National
Register of Historic Places and the State Historic Register. Information and
review forms could be placed on the Town’s website. Listing alone would not

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 50
prevent homeowners from modifying the exterior of their homes but can enhance
the opportunity for assistance to restore structures.
o Retain the Town’s two established Historic Corridors which are focused around
the two New York State Historic Sites; Knox Headquarters and the New Windsor
Cantonment. The boundaries of the two corridors are as follows:
New Windsor Cantonment Historical Corridor: This corridor runs from
the New York State Thruway Overpass on Route 207 (Little Britain Road)
in a southeasterly direction along Routes 207 and 300 (Temple Hill Road),
to the intersection of Route 300 and Old Temple Hill Road. The extent of
the district is 400 feet on each side of the right-of-way line of the
designated road.
Knox Headquarters Historical Corridor: This corridor runs from the
intersection of Route 94 (Blooming Grove Turnpike) in an easterly
direction along Forge Hill Road to the intersection of Forge Hill Road and
Route 9W. The extent of the district is 400 feet on each side of the right-
of-way of the designated road.
o Ensure that state landmarks, designated by the Town’s architectural survey as
locally important and properties which generally contribute to the character of an
established historic district are retained with their historic features and altered as
little as possible.
o Ensure that new construction or structural alterations to existing structures are
compatible with a historic district’s character.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 51
VII. UTILITIES
A.
Goals
Goal: Provide for the orderly and responsible development and expansion of water and
sewerage systems in the Town; limit expansion west of the Thruway.
Goal: Manage the Town’s water resources to maintain and where possible improve
water quality and quantity.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
1.
Water Supply
New Windsor presently has 13 water districts in the eastern half and north central portion
of the Town (refer to Figure 10).
The Town’s water is supplied from the Catskill aqueduct which feeds from the Ashokan
Reservoir. The water feeds into two separate water filtration plants: Reily Filtration Plant
which as a capacity of approximately 3 million gallons per day, and Stewart Airport
filtration plant which has a capacity of approximately 500,000 gallons per day. Local
water demand typically varies based on time of year but generally averages between 2.4
and 2.5 million gallons per day. Daily peak demand can vary between 3.6 and 3.8
million gallons per day during the summer months.
On August 27, 2007 officials from the Town of New Windsor signed an agreement with
the City of Newburgh to provide the Town with an additional 1 million gallons of water
supply per day for the next 20 years. After this period has expired the Town has the
option to renew the contract with the City.
Water supply will come from three separate connection points: the Silver Stream
Reservoir, Little Britain Road, and Route 32 (Miron Lumber). If water is drawn from the
Silver Stream Reservoir, New Windsor will pay Newburgh the same rate New York City
charges for aqueduct water; if from the other connections, Newburgh will charge the
Town the same fee as the “in-city” rate.
This important agreement will not only ensure a stable water supply for the residents of
New Windsor, but also makes protection of the watershed and prevention of water waste
a mutual responsibility.
The Town is also exploring additional water supply from the development of new high-
yield groundwater supply wells and planned expansion of the Reily and Stewart filtration
plants.
The Orange County Water Authority is presently evaluating the feasibility of connecting
the Catskill and Delaware aqueducts to provide an additional backup source.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 52
A portion of the residential development surrounding Beaverdam Lake is served by the
Beaver Dam community well system, a private corporation (approximately 150 of 700
homes).
A number of developments within the Town have been approved by the Town Planning
Board but have not yet been built because they are subject to the Town’s current water
moratorium which was imposed by resolution of the Town Board on January 3, 2003.
This moratorium prohibits new developments from connecting to the Town’s water
system unless adequate mitigation measures are implemented.
In addition, the Town is actively seeking to improve its water supply system. Towards
that end, in August 2007 the Town entered into an agreement with the City of Newburgh
to acquire up to an additional 1 million GPD of water from the City for various public
and municipal purposes which the Town can access and use in addition to the regular and
usual supply available from the New York City Catskill Aqueduct. The Town has also
recently applied for and received a permit from the NYSDEC to add additional water
supply wells, known as the Saint Anne’s wells, to its water supply system.
2.
Sewer
New Windsor presently has 24 sewer districts in the eastern half and north central portion
of the Town, as well as one located around Beaver Dam Lake in the south central portion
of the Town (refer to Figure 11).
New Windsor is presently in a sewer moratorium that has been imposed by the Town
Board due to the lack of additional capacity in the system. Any additional capacity that
does exist is slated for existing districts. Presently the average sewer flow within the
Town is approximately 4 million gallons per day. The Town’s sewage treatment facility
is located adjacent to the Moodna Creek on U.S. Route 9W in the southeastern portion of
the Town.
One major problem that has been identified by the Town Engineer is ground and surface
water infiltration and inflow. The Town is currently monitoring infiltration and inflow
within the system to work towards correcting the problem.
Moodna Development Corporation previously had a sewer allocation of approximately
1.2 million gallons per day prior to the Corporation’s closing. This additional capacity is
being divided between the Town of New Windsor and Majestic Weaving.
The Town is presently exploring the expansion of its existing plant to 10.75 million
gallons per day. The expansion should be addressed as economic development requires.
Two pumping stations are being upgraded as a result of ongoing development within the
Town.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 53
C.
Recommendations
o Where appropriate capacity exists, a development that is consistent with the
Town’s planning policies, zoning, land use controls, and surrounding
neighborhood should be able to tie into existing Town water and sewer systems or
package plants in order to protect aquifers, streams, and waterbodies.
o New water and sewer districts should be permitted to be free standing if practical
and any new infrastructure costs should be the responsibility of the developer.
o Priority for municipal water and sewer should be given to existing districts with
any expansion limited to infill and possible municipal expansion only if the
capacity is available and only if the proposed development is consistent with the
Town’s planning objectives, zoning, sound land use principals and environmental
controls.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 54
VIII. AGRICULTURE
A.
Goals
Goal: Preserve the agricultural resources of New Windsor, as an important component
of the community’s economy and exurban character.
Goal: Protect working agricultural landscapes and operations as development
pressures continue to increase.
B.
Summary of Existing Conditions
Agriculture and agricultural related uses continue to represent an important segment of
the Town’s economy and existing land use, primarily west of the Thruway
(approximately 11% of total land area in the Town). A portion of the Town is located
within Agricultural District No. 1, which was created by the New York State Legislature
in 1972.
Pineview Farm, New Windsor
As development pressures continue to increase in the region the preservation of
agricultural land and the Town’s remaining rural and exurban character have diminished.
The issue of farmland conversions is of paramount importance for New Windsor.
C.
Recommendations
o Insure that zoning regulations do not inhibit the operation of existing agricultural
operations.
o Promote agriculture-based tourism in New Windsor. This may include “pick-
your-own” or “cut-your-own” type operations that would add to the local
economy while keeping farming activities in the public eye.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 55
o Allow for increased flexibility in permitting alternative uses for existing
agricultural facilities or buildings in order to assure economic viability. These
alternative uses should include only those compatible with the surrounding
neighborhood, but could include wineries, cold storage, and processing.
o Promote citizen education on farmland preservation.
o Revisit current regulations relating to housing and maintaining horses in the
Town’s Zoning Code to assure adequate space, buffering and the well being of
animals. Land requirements should incrementally increase on a sliding scale
based on the number of horses.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 56
IX.
LAND USE & ZONING
A.
Summary of Existing Conditions
1.
Land Use
Existing land use information for the Town was obtained from the Town of New
Windsor’s Assessor’s Office, Orange County GIS, and the New York State Office of
Real Property Services. This information was supplemented and updated through field
checks and a review of aerial orthophotography. In addition, drafts of the land use maps
were coordinated with and reviewed by the Citizens Advisory Committee members for
additional accuracy.
The Town is comprised of approximately 23,500 acres or 36.6 square miles of land and
water area. Approximately 26 percent is vacant, 11 percent is agricultural, 24 percent is
occupied by Stewart State Forest and another 2 percent is occupied by Stewart Airport
(refer to Table 20).
The following general categories of land use have been utilized in the development of the
Plan:
o Agricultural – Property actively used for the production of crops or livestock.
o Commercial – Property used for the sale of goods and/or services. Includes
hotels, restaurants, storage facilities, retail services, banks and office buildings,
and multi-purpose properties.
o Community Services – Property used for the well-being of the community.
Includes schools, religious facilities, health care facilities, and government
facilities.
o Forested – Lands covered by mature forests, such as large state parks.
o Industrial – Property used for the production and fabrication of durable and non-
durable goods. Includes manufacturing and processing uses.
o Public Services – Property used to provide services to the general public.
Includes utility and communication services, transportation services (excluding
roads) and waste disposal facilities.
o Recreation & Entertainment – Property used by groups for recreation, amusement
or entertainment. Includes sports facilities, beaches, marinas, and parks.
o Residential – Property used for human habitation including single- and multi-
family, year round and seasonal residences.
o Vacant – Property that is not in use or lacks permanent improvement.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 57
Figure 12 illustrates the existing land uses and concentrations of land use activities
throughout the Town (broken down into more detailed categories than described above).
It should be noted that the Land Use Plan map is generalized and is not designed to
convey specific land use on a parcel by parcel basis or specific boundaries of future
zoning.
A summary of current land use categories, including the percentage of total land area and
square miles are identified in Table 20.
Table 20 – Existing Land Use by Category, 2007
Land Use Category
Percent of Total Land
Area*
Square Miles*
One-Family Residential
21%
7.8
Two-Family Residential
<1%
0.2
Multi-Family Residential
1%
0.4
Commercial
2%
0.7
Office
<1%
0.1
Mixed Use
1%
0.4
Town Owned/Public (other than parks & rec.)
1%
0.4
Quasi-Public (churches, schools, etc.)
7%
2.6
Stewart International Airport
2%
0.7
Park/Recreation
4%
1.5
Agriculture
11%
4.1
Stewart State Forest
24%
8.9
Industrial
2%
0.7
Utilities or Railroad
6%
2.2
Vacant Land
12%
4.4
Unclassified
4%
1.5
Prepared by Turner Miller Group
Source: Orange County GIS
* Values rounded
2.
Existing Zoning
Existing zoning in New Windsor, illustrated on Figure 13, is generally consistent with the
permitted uses in the respective districts. The Town’s zoning boundaries divide the
Town into several distinct areas with their own types of land uses and concentrations of
compatible uses that define the overall character of the community. The text of the
zoning regulations identify the uses permitted in each of the zoning districts as well as the
applicable bulk and dimensional requirements for each zoning district. Currently the
Town has thirteen separate zoning designations as follows:

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 58
o R-1
Rural Residential
o R-2
Open Space Residential
o R-3
Suburban Residential
o R-4
Suburban Residential
o R-5
Multiple Family Residential
o CL-1 Clustered Suburban Residential
o AP
Airport Uses
o AP-1 Airport Uses
o C
Design Shopping
o NC
Neighborhood Commercial
o OLI
Office and Light Industrial
o PI
Planned Industrial
o PO
Professional Office
Uses permitted within each of the thirteen zoning districts in the Town as well as
applicable bulk and dimensional requirements can be found in the Town’s Zoning Local
Law.
While the Town’s current zoning is generally consistent with land uses, several
inconsistencies exist. These inconsistencies are addressed in the Land Use Plan and
include:
o The medium density Suburban Residential (R-3) zone west of Beaver Dam Lake
is inconsistent with existing land uses consisting primarily of agricultural land and
large lot residential uses.
o The Office and Light Industrial (OLI) Zone along Route 207 east of Station Road
is inconsistent with existing land uses in the area consisting primarily of single-
family residential and vacant land uses.
o The southern frontage along Little Britain Road (Route 207), east of the Thruway,
presently zoned Planned Industry (PI), is inconsistent with existing land uses
consisting primarily of residential and limited commercial uses.
o The area east of the Thruway and west of Route 300 between the Last
Encampment of the Continental Army and Mertes Lane, presently zoned Planned
Industrial (PI), is inconsistent with existing land uses consisting primarily of
residential, park, and vacant land uses.
Senior Housing
In addition to the above zoning districts the Town recently passed legislation restricting
senior housing developments to a redrawn and limited Senior Housing Overlay District.
Such age restricted residential developments, must be sited on lots of at least five acres,
and require the issuance of a special permit from the Town Board and subsequent site
plan review by the Planning Board. The legislation’s stated intent is to encourage
housing opportunities for senior citizens and to ensure that developments are sited in

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 59
appropriate areas. Allowable density is restricted to nine units per acre with up to
fourteen units per acre permitted if a development provides affordable housing as defined
in the law. In the case where 100 percent of proposed units are affordable a density of up
to 18 units per acre is permitted.
Affordable housing is defined as residential units available for a sales price or rental fee
that will be affordable to households earning 100 percent of the Orange County, New
York, median family income as established by the United States Department of Housing
and Urban Development; or if no such statistics are available, then as that term may be
defined by and for the County of Orange, Department of Planning.
3.
Planning & Zoning in Adjoining Communities
The following describes existing zoning along the bordering portions of communities
directly adjacent to the Town of New Windsor. This is important in understanding the
relationship of adjoining zoning and land uses with the Town in order to achieve
compatibility or provide a basis for reconciling differences if practical or possible.
Town of Montgomery
The area of Montgomery that borders New Windsor is zoned for Industrial use.
Bordering districts include the I-1, I-3 and I-4 which allow for general industrial uses,
machinery plants, laboratories, wholesale businesses and incinerators.
Town of Newburgh
Most of the land within the Town of Newburgh which borders New Windsor is part of or
related to Stewart Airport. Land is zoned mainly for industrial uses (I), an Interchange
Business Zone (IB) and a small Professional Office zone (O) on the eastern border with
the City of Newburgh.
City of Newburgh
The City of Newburgh has a wide variety of Zones which border the Town of New
Windsor. The majority of the land along the border is zoned for heavy commercial and
industrial use with Heavy Commercial/ Light Industrial (I-1) and Waterfront Industrial
(W-2) zoning designations. The western portion of the border is zoned Office and
Distribution (PO-2). A small area surrounding Lake Street is zoned for commercial use
(C-3).
Town of Hamptonburgh
Hamptonburgh’s zoning on its border with the Town of New Windsor is mainly
residential, consisting of single family residences on lots ranging in allowable size
between two and three acres. A small portion of land on the north end of the boundary
consists of an Industrial Park District (IP).

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 60
Town of Cornwall
The area of Cornwall that borders New Windsor is zoned for Residential use of varying
densities, commercial, and office and industrial uses. Bordering districts include the SR-
1 and SR-2 Suburban Residence Districts, the SLR Suburban Low-Density Residence
District, the HC Highway Commercial District, and the PIO Planning Industrial and
Office District.
Town of Blooming Grove
The area of Blooming Grove that borders New Windsor is zoned Rural Residential (RR)
2-acre minimum lot sizes are required.
B.
Recommendations
The recommendations for future use of land follow from the goals and recommendations
included in the various plan elements discussed above.
The Land Use Plan reflects modifications, clarifications, and refinements of Town policy
as currently reflected in the Town Zoning Ordinance and Map. In all instances the future
development or redevelopment of these areas will be required to meet high design and
land utilization standards. The primary purposes of the land use plan categories are as
follows:
o Low and high density residential zones will essentially retain the densities and
uses now permitted in the R-1 and R-2 (low density) and R-5 (high density)
zones. The Town may wish to consider increasing the permitted density for one-
family dwellings in the R-5 Zone from 1 unit per acre to 3 to 4 units per acre.
o Medium density residential zones (R-3 and R-4) will permit the Town’s pre
October 2001 densities for one-family dwellings. The minimum lot area in the R-
3 Zone will vary between 21,780 and 43,560 square feet depending on the
availability of central water and sewer. The minimum lot area in the R-4 Zone
will vary between 15,000 and 43,560 square feet depending on the availability of
central water and sewer.
o The Office-Residential category is intended to allow some flexibility in office
uses while retaining the residential character, particularly of the section of Route
207 between Station Road and Lake Road.
o The Office category will retain the uses presently permitted in the Town’s zoning.
Its purpose is to encourage office development, but not a broad range of
commercial activity.
o The Highway Commercial category will permit a full range of commercial
activity along major highways. Residential development is not included in this
category.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 61
o The Neighborhood Commercial category will permit commercial uses and offices
intended to serve the immediate area or neighborhood, primarily with
convenience goods and services.
o The Limited Commercial category will permit a greater range and more intensive
land uses than what is permitted in the Neighborhood Commercial zone. This
will include retail stores and restaurants, service establishments, professional
office buildings, hotels and motels, mini warehouses, and other similar uses. This
category does not include large shopping centers and big-box stores because of
the smaller lots and character of the Route 207 Corridor.
o Mixed Use is a category intended to limit the size and scale of commercial, office,
and possibly residential uses along major highway corridors.
Mixed use
development will be encouraged.
o The Riverfront Development category is designed to encourage reuse of primarily
industrial waterfront areas with water dependent and water enhanced activities.
Additional access to the Hudson River is encouraged where possible.
o The Campus Economic Development category will encourage high quality
economic activity generated by the presence of Stewart Airport. This will include
hotel, conference center, educational facilities, high tech business, corporate
offices and similar uses.
o The Airport & Planned Development category is similar to the Campus Economic
Development category but will occur on airport lands where opportunities exist.
o The Office & Light Industrial is also similar to the Campus Economic
Development category but will occur on smaller parcels and will encourage
smaller industrial uses.
o The Planned Industrial category will encourage a full range of non-nuisance
environmentally sensitive industrial activities.
The proposed pattern of land use is reflected on the Proposed Land Use Plan map (refer
to Figure 14). The Land Use Plan establishes the predominant land use attributes in each
area and along major corridors. The proposals, such as watershed protection overlays
will be translated into regulations in the implementation phase of the Plan.
Once the Proposed Land Use Plan map is converted and translated into the Town’s
Official Zoning Map the zone boundaries will generally follow lot lines.
o Eliminate the higher density residential area west of Beaver Dam Lake (currently
zoned R-3) and convert to a lower density consistent with the area’s surrounding
Rural Residential (R-1) zoning.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 62
o Eliminate a portion of the higher density residential area directly west of the
Silver Stream Reservoir (currently zoned R-3) and convert to a lower density
consistent with the area’s surrounding Rural Residential (R-1 and R-2) zoning.
o Eliminate the Office and Light Industrial (OLI) Zone along Route 207 east of
Station Road and create a new Office Residential (OR) district. This new land
use and zoning category should permit offices in residential structures on lots
fronting Route 207. New development should be consistent with the area’s
existing residential character and surroundings and would be built out at a low
density.
o Eliminate the Neighborhood Commercial (NC) Zone along Route 207 from Silver
Stream Road to just west of Jackson Avenue and create a new Limited
Commercial (LC) district.
o Eliminate the portion of the senior housing overlay district west of the Silver
Stream Reservoir to reduce the intensity of development near the Reservoir, a
public drinking water source.
o Rezone the Bivona Lane area directly south of Route 207 in the vicinity of
Stewart Airport from Suburban Residential (R-3) to Limited Commercial (LC).
o Extend the existing Planned Industry (PI) Zone east of Route 32 in the
northeastern portion of the Town by rezoning the town-owned lands northeast of
Ruscitti Road from Suburban Residential (R-4) to Planned Industry (PI).
o Rezone a small portion (6 lots) of the northern frontage along Union Avenue east
of Route 32 in the vicinity of James Street and Daniher Avenue from Suburban
Residential (R-4) to Highway Commercial (HC).
o Rezone portions of the northeastern most section of the Town both east and west
of River Road from Planned Industry (PI) to Riverfront Development (RD). This
new zoning should permit uses such as restaurants, retail, theaters, galleries,
marinas, mixed use residential and other water dependent or water enhanced uses.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 63
1220 River Road – Frontage on Hudson River
o Rezone the southern frontage (generally one lot deep) along Little Britain Road
(Route 207), east of the Thruway to Washington Lake from Planned Industry (PI)
and Suburban Residential (R-4) to mixed use. The mixed use area would include
residential and limited commercial development.
o Rezone the area east of the Thruway and west of Route 300 between the Last
Encampment of the Continental Army and Mertes Lane as medium density
residential.
o Rezone the 400+/- acre tract of land adjacent to Stewart Airport (east and west of
Route 747) from AP to Airport and Planned Development. This new zone should
permit airport related development such as hotels, conference centers, and
medical, educational, and high end research and office space in a campus like
setting with significant open space, landscaped buffers, architectural guidelines,
etc.
o There are not presently any zoning regulations pertaining to setbacks and/or the
placement of ‘customary and incidental uses’ in residential zones for such items
as tennis courts, jungle gyms, basketball courts, etc. The Town should include
language in its zoning to regulate the placement of such incidental uses to limit
any potential impacts they may pose on the surrounding neighborhood.
o Establish setback requirements for parking areas, driveways, roads and buffer
areas.
o Modify zoning text and map to position zoning district boundaries along property
lines and assure buffers between residential and business uses, where appropriate
and practicable.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 64
o Set up an escrow system for developers to assure adequate funds for necessary
planning, engineering, and other expert reviews to assist the Planning Board
during all project reviews.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 65
X.
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
This section includes a description and prioritization of the specific actions items that the
Town should take to implement the Plan. An incremental approach to the Plan’s
implementation is most appropriate as the availability of staff, funding, and other
resources will be important.
The Town Board is ultimately responsible for implementation of this Plan. However, the
key to successful implementation is the cooperation and coordination of the various
Town boards and agencies responsible for land use decisions.
The Comprehensive Plan should be understood as a “living document”; a document that
will need to be updated and adjusted from time to time to reflect the current needs and
conditions of the Town. Because of this the Town Board should monitor the successful
implementation of the Plan, by reviewing strategies on an annual basis.
Prior to the adoption of the Plan the SEQR process will be completed by the Town
Board. This process consists of drafting and adopting a Generic Environmental Impact
Statement (GEIS) for the Plan.
Detailed descriptions of each of the following key implementation items can be found in
each of the corresponding sections of the Plan.
A.
High Priority Implementation Items
These implementation action items should be initiated within 1 year of the adoption of
the Plan.
1.
Population, Housing, & Residential Development
o Increase the permitted residential densities in the R-3 and R-4 zones. Potential
changes should take available water and sewer infrastructure into account.
o Develop appropriate development standards for each type of senior housing in the
Town’s ordinance.
o Establish a committee of senior citizens to keep abreast of the latest trends in
senior housing by identifying and investigating successful endeavors of other
municipalities.
o Develop a Conservation Cluster Overlay Zone that would allow for incentives in
the form of increased residential density in exchange for the preservation and/or
dedication of open space lands as part of a development.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 66
2.
Economic Development
o Develop a plan and zoning framework for the utilization of the 400+/- acre tract
of land adjacent to Stewart Airport that is not part of the Stewart State Forest.
o Develop public-private development relationships with major private landholders
along River Road and the Hudson River in an effort to redevelop areas of the
waterfront for public access, commercial (retail, office, restaurant, entertainment,
etc.), recreational, and mixed-use residential.
3.
Natural Resources
o Adopt a watershed protection law and overlay zone delineated by the boundaries
of the drainage areas of the Silver Stream Reservoir and Washington Lake and
generally within 100 feet of the banks of ponds, creeks and streams in the Town.
o Adopt aquifer protection regulations.
o Adopt environmental protection laws that protect all streams/creeks, waterbodies,
wetlands and floodplains in the Town.
o Establish a permitting process for activities that occur within stream, wetland, and
floodplain protection buffers.
o Draft and adopt a tree preservation law to help protect the Town’s woodland
character.
4.
Transportation
o Perform a traffic and pedestrian safety analysis of the Five Corners Intersection.
Provide crosswalks at the Intersection.
o Pursue a connection of Routes 300 and 94 and Routes 300 and 32 by establishing
a bypasses around the Five Corners Intersection. Pursue similar proposal where
opportunity exists.
o Create highway improvement overlay zones along:
Route 300 and Route 207 from the five corners intersection to and
including Route 747.
Route 94, from the five corners intersection a short distance southwest to
the Thruway overpass.
Route 94, from the five corners intersection to the Newburgh City line.
Route 32, from the five corners intersection to the Newburgh City line.
o Identify areas within the Town where traffic calming is appropriate due to
excessive speed, congestion or high levels of pedestrian activity.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 67
o Design and implement traffic calming techniques where deemed appropriate.
o Reduce speed limits where appropriate. For the most part, this will require
coordination with County and NYSDOT.
5.
Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources
o In subdivisions where sidewalks are deemed inappropriate, additional recreational
facilities should be considered to offset the loss of the recreational benefits
associated with sidewalks.
o The Town should consider amending its fee schedule to increase the recreation
fee for projects where the Planning Board has waived the required sidewalks.
This will offset the loss of recreational opportunities provided by sidewalks, and
will also enhance the Town's available resources for Town recreational facilities
to meet the recreational needs of the new homes.
6.
Agriculture
o Revisit current regulations relating to housing and maintaining horses in the
Town’s Zoning Code to assure adequate space, buffering and the well being of
animals.
7.
Land Use & Zoning
Review and revise the Town Zoning Code to achieve the following objectives:
o Eliminate the higher density residential area west of Beaver Dam Lake (currently
zoned R-3) and convert to a lower density consistent with the area’s surrounding
Rural Residential (R-1) zoning.
o Eliminate a portion of the higher density residential area directly west of the
Silver Stream Reservoir (currently zoned R-3) and convert to a lower density
consistent with the area’s surrounding Rural Residential (R-1 and R-2) zoning.
o Eliminate the Office and Light Industrial (OLI) Zone along Route 207 east of
Station Road and create and new Office Residential (OR) district. This new land
use and zoning category would permit offices in residential structures on lots
fronting Route 207. New development should be consistent with the area’s
existing character and surroundings and would be built out at a low density.
o Eliminate the Neighborhood Commercial (NC) Zone along Route 207 from Silver
Stream Road to just west of Jackson Avenue and create a new Limited
Commercial (LC) district.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 68
o Eliminate the portion of the senior housing overlay district west of the Silver
Stream Reservoir to reduce the intensity of development near the Reservoir, a
public drinking water source.
o Rezone the Bivona Lane area directly south of Route 207 in the vicinity of
Stewart Airport from Suburban Residential (R-3) to Limited Commercial (LC).
o Extend the existing Planned Industry (PI) Zone east of Route 32 in the
northeastern portion of the Town by rezoning the town-owned lands northeast of
Ruscitti Road from Suburban Residential (R-4) to Planned Industry (PI).
o Rezone a small portion (6 lots) of the northern frontage along Union Avenue east
of Route 32 in the vicinity of James St. and Daniher Avenue from Suburban
Residential (R-4) to Highway Commercial (HC).
o Rezone portions of the northeastern most section of the Town both east and west
of River Road from Planned Industry (PI) to Riverfront Development (RD). This
new zoning should permit uses such as restaurants, retail, theaters, galleries,
marinas, mixed use residential and other water dependent or water enhanced uses.
o Rezone the southern frontage (generally one lot deep) along Little Britain Road
(Route 207), east of the Thruway to Washington Lake from Planned Industry (PI)
and Suburban Residential (R-4) to mixed use.
o Rezone the area east of the Thruway and west of Route 300 between the Last
Encampment of the Continental Army and Mertes Lane as medium density
residential.
o Rezone the 400+/- acre tract of land adjacent to Stewart Airport (east and west of
Route 747) from AP to Airport and Planned Development. This new zone should
permit airport related development such as hotels, conference centers, and
medical, educational, and high end research and office space in a campus like
setting with significant open space, landscaped buffers, architectural guidelines,
etc.
o There are not presently any zoning regulations pertaining to setbacks and/or the
placement of ‘customary and incidental uses’ in residential zones for such items
as tennis courts, jungle gyms, basketball courts, etc. The Town should include
language in its zoning to regulate the placement of such incidental uses to limit
any potential impacts they may pose on the surrounding neighborhood.
o Establish setback requirements for parking areas, driveways, roads and buffer
areas.
o Modify zoning text and map to position zoning district boundaries along property
lines and assure buffers between residential and business uses, where appropriate
and practicable.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 69
o Set up an escrow system for developers to assure adequate funds for necessary
planning, engineering, and other expert reviews to assist the Planning Board
during all project reviews.
B.
Moderate Priority Implementation Items
These implementation action items should be initiated within 2 to 5 years of the adoption
of the Plan.
1.
Population, Housing, & Residential Development
o Coordinate building heights and floor area ratios (FAR) with set back
requirements in order to protect the integrity of neighborhoods. Further, the
Town may wish to restrict building footprints by a percentage of lot size to ensure
there is a sufficient area of the building lot for accessory uses.
2.
Natural Resources
o Designate aquifers as critical environmental areas (CEAs) as defined by the
regulations implementing the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act
(SEQRA).
o Enhance Stormwater Management practices within the Town.
o Adopt irrigation control regulations to control and reduce water used for lawn and
landscaping irrigation.
o Continue to monitor local blasting protocols to determine if modifications are
needed.
o Work in conjunction with Orange County and the Palisades Interstate Park
Commission to protect the Moodna Creek Corridor by creating a greenway by
linking the Knox Headquarters and Butterhill Park properties with the Hudson
River along the Town’s southeast border.
o Explore sources of funding (i.e. grants) that would allow for the additional
planting of street trees and shrubs along public thoroughfares.
3.
Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources
o Additional access to the Hudson River, including a potential boat-launch should
be included in future redevelopment of waterfront lands.
o Perform a comprehensive update to the architectural survey conducted in 1988 by
Colette Fulton, with assistance from the Town Historian.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 70
o Create a program that could provide positive recognition to historic resources in
the Town identified as important or significant by an updated architectural survey.
4.
Agriculture
o Promote citizen education on farmland preservation.
C.
Ongoing Implementation Items
These implementation action items should be initiated on an ongoing basis from the
adoption of the Plan.
1.
Population, Housing, & Residential Development
o Vegetative buffers should be created and or retained between developments and
local roadways and neighboring non-residential land uses in order to preserve the
rural residential character and scenic viewsheds within the Town.
o Encourage the production of housing appropriate to all segments of the
population, including lower, moderate, and upper income housing, to maintain a
balanced community. Consider variable zoning incentives and set asides to
achieve this objective.
o Developers of new subdivisions in the western portion of the Town should be
required to explore clustering as an option in order to conserve open space and
natural resources, create efficient infrastructure, including limiting the amount of
impervious surface, and providing diversity in housing.
o Senior citizen housing should be planned as part of the community where services
and utilities are available and where there is good access to transportation and
community services.
o The location of senior citizen housing in the Town should be limited to the
medium and high density residential zones identified on the Land Use Plan
(Figure 14)
o Require sidewalks in development that is of an appropriate density – generally
two units per acre or higher.
o Use available federal, state, and local resources to support the production of
affordable housing.
2.
Economic Development
o Large vegetative buffers in excess of 100 feet, to be determined by the Planning
Board, should be maintained between the airport and any development.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 71
o Developments should retain as many mature trees as possible as to not reduce
existing noise and visual barriers.
o Generally, commercial and industrial development should be limited to areas
already developed including infill.
o Commercial and corporate development should generally be encouraged along
Route 207 from Toleman Road east to Union Avenue and from Route 300 to the
Five Corners Intersection to support the airport and further economic
development.
o Future non-residential development should be limited along residential corridors
along Route 207, generally west of Toleman Road, and other predominantly
residential corridors in order to maintain the rural and historic qualities of these
areas (see Land Use Plan).
o Coordinate with the Orange County Partnership and Chamber of Commerce to
promote local business and quality employment in designated areas, particularly
in the eastern portion of the Town along major routes and thoroughfares.
o Developments should be designed using natural materials and be developed at a
pedestrian scale. Roofs should be pitched or gabled and other architectural
elements should be incorporated whenever possible in order to reduce monotony,
create interesting development, and retain the attractiveness of corridors.
o The size of a development should be appropriate for its surroundings. Large
facades, over 100 feet in length, should be designed to visually reduce the mass of
the building.
o Proximity of a development project to historic corridors or structures and rural or
scenic areas should be taken into consideration in design.
New development
should be designed to blend into the landscape in which it is being designed.
o Signage should be constructed of similar materials and color as the building to
which it is accessory. Pylon or pole signs should be avoided and monument signs
should only be permitted in cases where the Planning Board determines that a
building is not sufficiently visible from the roadway.
o Landscaping plans should be reviewed by the Planning Board during the planning
review process to ensure not only a mix of appropriate vegetation on the property
but also to ensure adequate screening from neighboring properties, around
parking areas and dumpster enclosures.
o Curb cuts should be minimized along congested commercial corridors and should
be set back from intersections.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 72
3.
Natural Resources
o Utilize available organizational and financial resources, within the budgetary
constraints of the Town to acquire/purchase or otherwise protect additional
watershed protection lands directly adjoining the Silver Stream Reservoir.
o Work jointly with the City of Newburgh to assist in the protection of City owned
watershed lands surrounding the Silver Stream Reservoir.
o Develop initiatives to encourage the use of varied transportation modes, including
non-motorized modes of walking and bicycling when feasible, reducing vehicular
emissions.
o Institute an energy conservation program through the following measures:
Consumer education with information available at Town Hall and on the
Town website.
Require developers to explore the use of alternate forms of energy,
particularly in new commercial or residential buildings. This should
include solar lighting where appropriate. The County and State offer
grants and tax incentives for green design.
Encourage new one- or two-family dwelling or multifamily dwellings of
three stories or less to meet the requirements for a New York Energy Star
labeled home.
o Encourage local government to utilize green building and energy conservation
technologies and practices in the renovation and construction of municipal
buildings and facilities.
o Encourage alternative approaches to development including residential
conservation clustering on larger lots particularly within environmentally
sensitive areas and particularly in the western portion of the Town. Cluster
development may be required at the discretion of the Planning Board.
o Work cooperatively with the New York State Department of Environmental
Conservation in the preservation and protection of the Stewart Forest lands.
o Continue to explore creative strategies for the acquisition of open space,
particularly open space that contributes to the protection of natural resources and
sensitive environments.
o Explore methods of providing public pedestrian access to watershed protection
areas of Town’s ponds and reservoirs for canoeing, fishing, and other activities.
o Open space that is created or maintained by the design of a subdivision should
provide for connections to other similar open spaces.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 73
o Work cooperatively with the Orange County and New York State departments of
transportation to ensure that trees are preserved or provided along County and
State routes within the Town.
4.
Transportation
o Require new subdivisions to connect to other local roads and adjacent
subdivisions within the Town and discourage the use of cul-de-sacs in order to aid
in circulation and keeping unnecessary traffic off major roadways. All new
connections should be unrestricted access. Traffic calming methods should be
implemented to ensure local neighborhood roadways are impacted as little as
possible by through traffic.
o Urge Orange County and the NYSDOT to construct turning lanes where
appropriate on major roadways as recommended in the NYSDOT Master Plan.
o Reduce access points along major roads and encourage joint use of curb cuts and
marginal access drives.
o Encourage the County to fund additional Dial-A-Bus service.
o Explore ways to increase access to bus service in the Town by expanding the
number of bus routes and stops.
o Encourage the development and maintenance of bus shelters along existing bus
routes throughout the Town
o Apply necessary signage in conjunction with traffic calming techniques especially
at known pedestrian crossings and near schools and recreation lands.
5.
Parks, Recreation, & Historic Resources
o Explore opportunities for emerging recreational needs including, but not limited
to skateboarding, equestrian trails, etc.
o Emphasis should be placed on maintaining and/or enhancing the physical
condition of parks where appropriate.
o Expand physical access to the Hudson River where possible.
o As development expands into the western portion of Town, additional recreational
sites and needs should be assessed. Consideration should be given to accessibility
to newly developing areas.
o The appropriateness of requiring sidewalks in new subdivisions in the Town
should be selected carefully to maximize their usefulness to the community.

New Windsor 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update
May 6, 2009
Town of New Windsor, Orange County, NY
Page 74
o Vegetative buffers should be required to protect historic developments and their
surrounding viewsheds from new developments.
o Encourage property owners to list their eligible properties on the National
Register of Historic Places and the State Historic Register.
6.
Utilities
o Where appropriate capacity exists, a development that is consistent with the
Town’s planning policies, zoning, land use controls, and surrounding
neighborhood should be able to tie into existing Town water and sewer systems or
package plants in order to protect aquifers, streams, and waterbodies.
o New water and sewer districts should be permitted to be free standing if practical
and any new infrastructure costs should be the responsibility of the developer.
o Priority for municipal water and sewer should be given to existing districts with
any expansion limited to infill and possible municipal expansion only if the
capacity is available and only if the proposed development is consistent with the
Town’s planning objectives, zoning, sound land use principals and environmental
controls.
7.
Agriculture
o Insure that zoning regulations do not inhibit the operation of existing agricultural
operations.
o Promote agriculture-based tourism in New Windsor. This may include “pick-
your-own” or “cut-your-own” type operations that would add to the local
economy while keeping farming activities in the public eye.
o Allow for increased flexibility in permitting alternative uses for existing
agricultural facilities or buildings in order to assure economic viability.

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